On-axis brilliance and power of in-vacuum undulators for the Advanced Photon Source.

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A request for studying the spectral performance of in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) for the APS storage ring was recently put forward. In-vacuum undulators are prevalent at other synchrotron radiation facilities such as the ESRF and the Spring-8. However, they never made it into the arsenal of undulators at the APS because the brilliance tuning curves were sufficiently wide due to the fact that the undulator minimum gap could be set as low as 10.5 mm. For sector 3, which in the past used a narrow-gap vacuum chamber, the minimum undulator pole gap was allowed to be set as low as 8.5 ... continued below

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Dejus, R.; Jaski, M. & Kim, S. H. November 25, 2009.

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A request for studying the spectral performance of in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) for the APS storage ring was recently put forward. In-vacuum undulators are prevalent at other synchrotron radiation facilities such as the ESRF and the Spring-8. However, they never made it into the arsenal of undulators at the APS because the brilliance tuning curves were sufficiently wide due to the fact that the undulator minimum gap could be set as low as 10.5 mm. For sector 3, which in the past used a narrow-gap vacuum chamber, the minimum undulator pole gap was allowed to be set as low as 8.5 mm, providing contiguous tuning curves between the first and third harmonic radiation for a 2.7-cm-period device. (Subsequently, the narrow-gap vacuum chamber was removed and replaced with a standard vacuum chamber, which allows a minimum gap of 10.5 mm.) For sector 4, which currently holds the only narrow-gap vacuum chamber at the APS, the minimum gap is 9.5 mm. In this sector, a permanent magnet hybrid undulator with SmCo magnets is used instead of NdFeB magnets because of their higher radiation resistance and their better protection against radiation-induced demagnetization of the magnets. In the realm of looking to the future, new concepts and technologies are being revisited. Most notable is the superconducting undulator (SCU) technology, which provides the ultimate highest magnetic field of any technology and design. The SCU program has been ongoing at the APS for several years and substantial progress has been made.3,4 However, the in-vacuum undulators may bridge some of the user demands, and it is therefore worthwhile revisiting their potential at the APS. In this work, the following were assumed or required: (1) the smallest in-vacuum beam-stay-clear gap is 5.0 mm, (2) a beam-liner of 2 x 0.060 mm, which increases the pole gap by the same amount, (3) both NdFeB and SmCo magnets shall be studied, even though SmCo magnets are the preferred choice for very small gaps, (4) compare the in-vacuum undulators with superconducting NbTi undulators with a wall thickness/space of 2 x 1.0 mm, and (5) all undulators will have an effective magnetic length of 2.4 m. Three short undulator period lengths were chosen somewhat arbitrary and studied. We will compare the performance of undulators with period lengths of 2.5 cm and 2.0 cm to one with a 1.6-cm period, which is the chosen period length of the first designed and tested short-length SCU for the APS. Additionally, we will make comparisons with the undulator A, which has a period length of 3.3 cm.

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  • Report No.: ANL/APS/LS-314
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-06CH11357
  • DOI: 10.2172/969637 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 969637
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc929357

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  • November 25, 2009

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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  • July 13, 2017, 9:15 a.m.

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Dejus, R.; Jaski, M. & Kim, S. H. On-axis brilliance and power of in-vacuum undulators for the Advanced Photon Source., report, November 25, 2009; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc929357/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.