Parallel processing for control applications

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Parallel processing has been a topic of discussion in computer science circles for decades. Using more than one single computer to control a process has many advantages that compensate for the additional cost. Initially multiple computers were used to attain higher speeds. A single cpu could not perform all of the operations necessary for real time operation. As technology progressed and cpu's became faster, the speed issue became less significant. The additional processing capabilities however continue to make high speeds an attractive element of parallel processing. Another reason for multiple processors is reliability. For the purpose of this discussion, reliability ... continued below

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10 p.

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Telford, J. W. (John W.) January 1, 2001.

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Description

Parallel processing has been a topic of discussion in computer science circles for decades. Using more than one single computer to control a process has many advantages that compensate for the additional cost. Initially multiple computers were used to attain higher speeds. A single cpu could not perform all of the operations necessary for real time operation. As technology progressed and cpu's became faster, the speed issue became less significant. The additional processing capabilities however continue to make high speeds an attractive element of parallel processing. Another reason for multiple processors is reliability. For the purpose of this discussion, reliability and robustness will be the focal paint. Most contemporary conceptions of parallel processing include visions of hundreds of single computers networked to provide 'computing power'. Indeed our own teraflop machines are built from large numbers of computers configured in a network (and thus limited by the network). There are many approaches to parallel configfirations and this presentation offers something slightly different from the contemporary networked model. In the world of embedded computers, which is a pervasive force in contemporary computer controls, there are many single chip computers available. If one backs away from the PC based parallel computing model and considers the possibilities of a parallel control device based on multiple single chip computers, a new area of possibilities becomes apparent. This study will look at the use of multiple single chip computers in a parallel configuration with emphasis placed on maximum reliability.

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10 p.

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  • Final version published in: ISA TECH/EXPO Technology Update Conference Proceedings ; 2001; v.416, p.131-136

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  • Report No.: LA-UR-01-4612
  • Grant Number: none
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 975696
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc928780

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • January 1, 2001

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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  • Dec. 12, 2016, 12:43 p.m.

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Telford, J. W. (John W.). Parallel processing for control applications, article, January 1, 2001; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc928780/: accessed October 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.