Single-spin microscope with sub-nanoscale resolution based on optically detected magnetic resonance

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Invention of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) initiated a new era of material science and technology characterized by 2-D imaging with atomic resolution and manipulation of individual atoms. However, for further progress in material science, and in particular in structural biology, 3-D imaging with sub-nanometer resolution is very desirable. Currently the most promising technique for 3-D imaging is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), which senses individual electron spins [1,2] with nanoscale resolution and can detect collective magnetization of about 100 nuclear spins [3]. The highest sensitivity demonstrated by MRFM is based on a time modulation technique ... continued below

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Berman, Gennady P & Chernobrod, Boris January 1, 2009.

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Invention of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) initiated a new era of material science and technology characterized by 2-D imaging with atomic resolution and manipulation of individual atoms. However, for further progress in material science, and in particular in structural biology, 3-D imaging with sub-nanometer resolution is very desirable. Currently the most promising technique for 3-D imaging is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), which senses individual electron spins [1,2] with nanoscale resolution and can detect collective magnetization of about 100 nuclear spins [3]. The highest sensitivity demonstrated by MRFM is based on a time modulation technique called the oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals (OSCAAR) which requires a long phase relaxation time T 2 of measured spins, which usually corresponds to rather low temperature. For example, a temperature of 300 mK was used in the case of 3D imaging of the tobacco mosaic virus [3]. This limitation is incompatible with the room-temperature operation needed for the study of biological systems under physiological conditions.

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  • Journal Name: Nature

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  • Report No.: LA-UR-09-00532
  • Report No.: LA-UR-09-532
  • Grant Number: AC52-06NA25396
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 956352
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc928536

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  • January 1, 2009

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  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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  • Dec. 12, 2016, 4:49 p.m.

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Berman, Gennady P & Chernobrod, Boris. Single-spin microscope with sub-nanoscale resolution based on optically detected magnetic resonance, article, January 1, 2009; [New Mexico]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc928536/: accessed September 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.