Office of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies

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High-level objective of this project is to develop nanoparticle based additive technology to improve friction and wear characteristics of engine oil with a long-term focus to enhance durability and efficiency of engines. The project encompasses a detailed investigation of various chemicals that favors stable boundary film formation and therefore reduce friction and wear of engine components. These active chemicals designed as nanomaterials will be surface-stabilized to gain maximum dispersion stability in a lubricant media. This effort shall be focused with the following objectives in mind: develop active nanoparticle composite, optimize process design, detailed tribological testing and surface characterization, physical and ... continued below

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Boucher, Cheryl September 30, 2009.

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Description

High-level objective of this project is to develop nanoparticle based additive technology to improve friction and wear characteristics of engine oil with a long-term focus to enhance durability and efficiency of engines. The project encompasses a detailed investigation of various chemicals that favors stable boundary film formation and therefore reduce friction and wear of engine components. These active chemicals designed as nanomaterials will be surface-stabilized to gain maximum dispersion stability in a lubricant media. This effort shall be focused with the following objectives in mind: develop active nanoparticle composite, optimize process design, detailed tribological testing and surface characterization, physical and chemical characterization of nanomaterials, and limited component level testing to document friction and wear improvements. Additional motivation is to minimize sulfur/phosphorous contents and lower ash forming components in additives and therefore improve aftertreatment functioning and emission. This effort shall be focused, over a two year funding period: Phase-I will be primarily a feasibility study, which includes selection of components for active nanoparticles, design and formulation, and synthesis of the active nanoparticles, optimize process design, physical and chemical characterization of nanomaterials, tribological testing and document friction and wear improvements. As a continuous effort of the Phase-I, Phase-II will focus on the optimization of the identified nanoparticle-based additives specifically for DOE strategic goal - minimizing S and P contents in additives and lowering ash-forming components. Additional efforts will also be invested in extended component level tribo-testing, manufacturing process scale-up, cost evaluation, and commercial viability assessment. In boundary lubrication, mating surfaces in direct physical contact are in surface asperities dimensional scale. These conditions may benefit from the nanometric size of the advanced nanoparticle lubricants in the following ways: (1) by supplying nano to sub-micron size lubricating agents which reduce friction and wear at the asperity contact zone, (2) by enabling strong metal adsorption and easy wetting, (3) by reacting with the surface to form durable lubricating 'transient transfer' films, sustain high loads and also retain under high temperatures, and (4) by enabling all these at minimal cost and great environmental safety. Suitably designed nanomaterials can significantly lower sulfur and phosphorus level in the lubricant additive pack, and therefore positively impact after-treatment catalyst life and exhaust emissions.

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  • Report No.: None
  • Grant Number: FC26-07NT43277
  • DOI: 10.2172/963895 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 963895
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc926409

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • September 30, 2009

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 13, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Dec. 7, 2016, 6:25 p.m.

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Boucher, Cheryl. Office of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies, report, September 30, 2009; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc926409/: accessed July 15, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.