Adolescent Self-Mutilating Behaviors: Experiential Avoidance Coupled with Imitation? Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title Adolescent Self-Mutilating Behaviors: Experiential Avoidance Coupled with Imitation?

Creator

  • Author: Howe-Martin, Laura S.
    Creator Type: Personal

Contributor

  • Chair: Murrell, Amy R.
    Contributor Type: Personal
    Contributor Info: Major Professor
  • Chair: Guarnaccia, Charles A.
    Contributor Type: Personal
    Contributor Info: Major Professor
  • Committee Member: Cox, Randall J.
    Contributor Type: Personal
  • Committee Member: Fleming, Donna
    Contributor Type: Personal
  • Committee Member: Smith, Richard
    Contributor Type: Personal

Publisher

  • Name: University of North Texas
    Place of Publication: Denton, Texas

Date

  • Creation: 2008-08
  • Digitized: 2008-09-19

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: Repetitive self-mutilation (RSM) has become increasingly prevalent among adolescents. Empirical research has pinpointed several correlates of this behavior, but the initiation and maintenance of RSM among adolescents are not well understood. The experiential avoidance model (EAM) proposes that self-mutilation is a behavior that allows for the avoidance or alteration of unwanted internal experiences, and that it is negatively reinforced with repetition. The current study explored the usefulness of the EAM as an explanatory theory for adolescent RSM, with the additional incorporation of issues of social context. Adolescents (N = 211) from three school-based samples completed self-report questionnaires. One-third of students reported at least one incident of purposeful, non-suicidal self-mutilation and 16% had engaged in self-mutilation repeatedly within the past 6 months. Both regression and group analyses indicated that adolescents who engage in RSM report greater psychological distress, a greater incidence of functionally equivalent behaviors, and greater exposure to self-mutilation among peers and/or in the media, when compared to their counterparts who have not engaged in RSM. Suicidal ideation/behaviors were consistently the strongest predictors of current self-mutilation behaviors. Clinical implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Subject

  • Keyword: self-injury
  • Keyword: deliberate self-harm
  • Keyword: Self-mutilation
  • Keyword: experiential avoidance
  • Keyword: adolescents
  • Library of Congress Subject Headings: Self-mutilation in adolescence.
  • Library of Congress Subject Headings: Adolescent psychopathology.
  • Library of Congress Subject Headings: Avoidance (Psychology)

Collection

  • Name: UNT Theses and Dissertations
    Code: UNTETD

Institution

  • Name: UNT Libraries
    Code: UNT

Rights

  • Rights Access: public
  • Rights License: copyright
  • Rights Holder: Howe-Martin, Laura S.
  • Rights Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.

Resource Type

  • Thesis or Dissertation

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • OCLC: 326878498
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc9087

Degree

  • Degree Name: Doctor of Philosophy
  • Degree Level: Doctoral
  • Degree Discipline: Clinical Psychology
  • Academic Department: Department of Psychology
  • Degree Grantor: University of North Texas

Note