Health message framing : motivating cardiovascular risk factor screening in young adults. Metadata

Metadata describes a digital item, providing (if known) such information as creator, publisher, contents, size, relationship to other resources, and more. Metadata may also contain "preservation" components that help us to maintain the integrity of digital files over time.

Title

  • Main Title Health message framing : motivating cardiovascular risk factor screening in young adults.

Creator

  • Author: Link-Malcolm, Jessica
    Creator Type: Personal

Contributor

  • Chair: Kelly, Kimberly S.
    Contributor Type: Personal
    Contributor Info: Major Professor
  • Committee Member: Collins, Frank
    Contributor Type: Personal
  • Committee Member: Toledo, Jose
    Contributor Type: Personal
  • Committee Member: Coggin, Claudia
    Contributor Type: Personal
  • Committee Member: Houtz, Andrew
    Contributor Type: Personal

Publisher

  • Name: University of North Texas
    Place of Publication: Denton, Texas

Date

  • Creation: 2008-08
  • Digitized: 2008-10-16

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: As the leading cause of death in the United States, coronary heart disease (CHD) is a growing public health problem, despite the fact that many risk factors for the disease are preventable, especially if addressed early in life. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of loss-framed versus gain-framed versus information-only health messages on both intention to attend and actual attendance at an appointment to get screened for CHD risk factors (i.e., hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia). It was hypothesized that a population of young adults would be more likely to view screening for CHD risk factors as a low-risk, health-affirming behavior as opposed to a risky, illness-detecting behavior and would thus be more strongly influenced by gain-framed messages than loss-framed messages. Additional goals included the exploration of the extensively researched individual health beliefs of perceived threat (as defined by the health belief model) and health locus of control as they relate to message frames. One hundred forty-three undergraduate students were randomly assigned to either the loss-framed, gain-framed, or information-only control conditions. Framing manipulation checks revealed that participants failed to discern differences in the tone and emphasis of the experimental pamphlets. As a result, no tests of framing effects could be conducted. Sixteen (11.2%) of the 143 participants who participated in Part 1 of the experiment participated in Part 2 (i.e., attended a risk factor screening appointment). Multiple regression analysis revealed risk index, age, and powerful others health locus of control as significant predictors of screening intention. Gender was the only demographic or health related variable that was significantly related to screening outcome, such that women were more likely to get screened than men. Limitations and recommendations are discussed.

Subject

  • Keyword: loss-framed
  • Keyword: Message framing
  • Keyword: CHD risk factors
  • Keyword: gain-framed
  • Library of Congress Subject Headings: Health behavior.
  • Library of Congress Subject Headings: College students -- Health risk assessment.
  • Library of Congress Subject Headings: Young adults -- Health risk assessment.
  • Library of Congress Subject Headings: Cardiovascular system -- Diseases -- Risk factors.
  • Library of Congress Subject Headings: Motivation (Psychology)

Collection

  • Name: UNT Theses and Dissertations
    Code: UNTETD

Institution

  • Name: UNT Libraries
    Code: UNT

Rights

  • Rights Access: public
  • Rights License: copyright
  • Rights Holder: Link-Malcolm, Jessica
  • Rights Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.

Resource Type

  • Thesis or Dissertation

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • OCLC: 341521767
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc9066

Degree

  • Degree Name: Doctor of Philosophy
  • Degree Level: Doctoral
  • Degree Discipline: Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine
  • Academic Department: Department of Psychology
  • Degree Grantor: University of North Texas

Note