THE ACCELERATION OF PARTICLES BY COLLECTIVE FIELDS II

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

The possibility of using the collective field of a large number of electrons to effect the acceleration of protons to high energies in a compact accelerator--or to permit acceleration of heavier ions in a manner not critically dependent on the charge-to-mass ratio of these ions--has been noted in an earlier Comment. A most attractive conceptual form for such an accelerator is the electron ring accelerator (ERA) and in the present Comment they direct attention to the basic phenomena--insofar as they know them--that govern the design and operation of an ERA. Briefly, the ERA concept visualizes the use of a compact ... continued below

Physical Description

14 p.

Creation Information

Laslett, L. Jackson & Sessler, Andrew M. October 1, 1970.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

The possibility of using the collective field of a large number of electrons to effect the acceleration of protons to high energies in a compact accelerator--or to permit acceleration of heavier ions in a manner not critically dependent on the charge-to-mass ratio of these ions--has been noted in an earlier Comment. A most attractive conceptual form for such an accelerator is the electron ring accelerator (ERA) and in the present Comment they direct attention to the basic phenomena--insofar as they know them--that govern the design and operation of an ERA. Briefly, the ERA concept visualizes the use of a compact ring of relativistic electrons that circulate in a plane perpendicular to an external magnetic field. The ring is partially neutralized by ions held in the potential well of the electrons. The electric field of these ions and the magnetic attractive forces between the circulating electrons then together act to overcome the electrostatic repulsion of the electrons and make possible the achievement of a configuration that is self-stable in the absence of external focusing fields. Acceleration of the ring with its accompanying ions, in a direction perpendicular to the plane of the ring, can be achieved (at the expense of the azimuthal motion of the electrons) by the action of a spatially decreasing magnetic guide field or, alternatively, by means of rf or pulsed electric fields. In any case the ring must provide a sufficiently strong'holding field' to permit ions to remain with the ring and thereby be carried to high energy in a short distance. An electron ring of suitable quality for this purpose might be formed by compressing a rather large and reasonably intense (e.g., {approx} 100 A, circulating) ring in a pulsed magnetic field, thereby reducing its major and minor radii from R {approx} 20 cm and a {approx} 1 cm to, for example, R {approx} 3 cm and a {approx} 0.1 cm. A ring of this intensity (N{sub e} {approx} 2-3 x 10{sup 12} electrons) and final dimensions would produce a holding field of some tens of MV per meter. The group at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna--formerly led by Veksler-- has been the first in forming and compressing rings and in demonstrating the acceleration of ions by means of them. Major development programs, employing pulsed compressors, are in progress at Dubna, Berkeley, Karlsruhe, and Garching (Munich). Related work with static-field compression is under way the University of Maryland and elsewhere. The possibilities and problems raised by the electron-ring concept have been reviewed recently by Keefe, who also provides some details concerning the experimental program at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley. The Soviet work has already demonstrated--to a certain degree--the validity of the basic ERA concept, but, if an ERA device is to be useful, it is necessary to achieve rings of high quality; that is, rings of small dimensions and containing large numbers of electrons. Attention, therefore, must be directed to the fundamental limitations upon rings. After reviewing, in Section 1, the fundamental limits on rings, they shall discuss in Section 2 of the Comment the ultimate performance (as presently foreseen) of an ERA. Finally, in Section 3, they attempt briefly to summarize the present status of the ERA development.

Physical Description

14 p.

Source

  • Journal Name: Comments on Nuclear and Particle Physics

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: UCRL-20149
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 937480
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc902106

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • October 1, 1970

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Oct. 28, 2016, 7:05 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Congratulations! It looks like you are the first person to view this item online.

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Laslett, L. Jackson & Sessler, Andrew M. THE ACCELERATION OF PARTICLES BY COLLECTIVE FIELDS II, article, October 1, 1970; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc902106/: accessed October 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.