Measurement of the Top Quark Mass using Dilepton Events and a Neutrino Weighting Algorithm with the D0 Experiment at the Tevatron (Run II)

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Elementary particle physics raises questions that are several thousand years old. What are the fundamental components of matter and how do they interact? These questions are linked to the question of what happened in the very first moments after the creation of the universe. Modern physics systematically tests nature to find answers to these and other fundamental questions. Precise theories are developed that describe various phenomena and at the same time are reduced to a few basic principals of nature. Simplification and reduction have always been guiding concepts of physics. The interplay between experimental data and theoretical descriptions led to ... continued below

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116 pages

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Meyer, Joerg & U., /Bonn January 1, 2007.

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Elementary particle physics raises questions that are several thousand years old. What are the fundamental components of matter and how do they interact? These questions are linked to the question of what happened in the very first moments after the creation of the universe. Modern physics systematically tests nature to find answers to these and other fundamental questions. Precise theories are developed that describe various phenomena and at the same time are reduced to a few basic principals of nature. Simplification and reduction have always been guiding concepts of physics. The interplay between experimental data and theoretical descriptions led to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics. It summarizes the laws of nature and is one of most precise descriptions of nature achieved by mankind. Despite the great success of the Standard Model it is not the ultimate theory of everything. Models beyond the Standard Model try to unify all interactions in one grand unified theory. The number of free parameters is attempted to be reduced. Gravity is attempted to be incorporated. Extensions to the Standard Model like supersymmetry address the so-called hierarchy problem. Precision measurements are the key for searches of new particles and new physics. A powerful tool of experimental particle physics are particle accelerators. They provide tests of the Standard Model at smallest scales. New particles are produced and their properties are investigated. In 1995 the heaviest known elementary particle, called top quark, has been discovered at Fermilab. It differs from all other lighter quarks due to the high mass and very short lifetime. This makes the top quark special and an interesting object to be studied. A rich program of top physics at Fermilab investigates whether the top quark is really the particle as described by the Standard Model. The top quark mass is a free parameter of the theory that has been measured precisely. This thesis presents a precise measurement of the top quark mass by the D0 experiment at Fermilab in the dilepton final states. The comparison of the measured top quark masses in different final states allows an important consistency check of the Standard Model. Inconsistent results would be a clear hint of a misinterpretation of the analyzed data set. With the exception of the Higgs boson, all particles predicted by the Standard Model have been found. The search for the Higgs boson is one of the main focuses in high energy physics. The theory section will discuss the close relationship between the physics of the Higgs boson and the top quark.

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116 pages

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  • Report No.: FERMILAB-THESIS-2007-65
  • Grant Number: AC02-07CH11359
  • DOI: 10.2172/935242 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 935242
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc901788

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • January 1, 2007

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Nov. 29, 2016, 7:46 p.m.

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Meyer, Joerg & U., /Bonn. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass using Dilepton Events and a Neutrino Weighting Algorithm with the D0 Experiment at the Tevatron (Run II), thesis or dissertation, January 1, 2007; Batavia, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc901788/: accessed November 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.