LDRD final report on nanovehicle light-driven propulsion.

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Having demonstrated the possibility of constructing nanoscale metallic vehicular bodies as described in last year's proposal, our goals have been to make uniform preparations of the metallized lipid assemblies and to determine the feasibility of powering these nanostructures with biological motors that are activated and driven by visible light. We desired that the propulsion system be constructed entirely by self-assembly and powered by a photocatalytic process partially already built into the nanovehicle. The nanovehicle we desire to build is composed of both natural biological components (ATPase, kinesin-microtubules) and biomimetic components (platinized liposomes, photosynthetic membrane) as functional units. The vehicle's body ... continued below

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14 p.

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Singh, Anup K.; van Swol, Frank B.; Shelnutt, John Allen; Medforth, Craig J. & Song, Yujiang December 1, 2004.

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Description

Having demonstrated the possibility of constructing nanoscale metallic vehicular bodies as described in last year's proposal, our goals have been to make uniform preparations of the metallized lipid assemblies and to determine the feasibility of powering these nanostructures with biological motors that are activated and driven by visible light. We desired that the propulsion system be constructed entirely by self-assembly and powered by a photocatalytic process partially already built into the nanovehicle. The nanovehicle we desire to build is composed of both natural biological components (ATPase, kinesin-microtubules) and biomimetic components (platinized liposomes, photosynthetic membrane) as functional units. The vehicle's body was originally envisioned to be composed of a surfactant liposomal bilayer coated with platinum nanoparticles, but instead of the expected nanoparticles we were able to grow dendritic 2-nm thick platinum sheets on the liposomes. Now, we have shown that it is possible to completely enclose the liposomes with sheeting to form porous platinum spheres, which show good structural stability as evidenced by their ability to survive the stresses of electron-microscopy sample preparation. Our goals were to control the synthesis of the platinized liposomes well enough to make uniform preparations of the coated individual liposomes and to develop the propulsion system for these nanovehicles a hydrogen-evolving artificial photosynthetic system in the liposomal bilayer that generates the pH gradient across the membrane that is necessary to drive the synthesis of ATP by ATP-synthase incorporated in the membrane. ATP produced would fuel the molecular motor (kinesin) attached to the vehicle, needing only light, storable ADP, phosphate, and an electron donor to be produced by ATP-synthase in the membrane. These research goals appear to be attainable, but growing the uniform preparations of the liposomes coated with dendritic platinum sheeting, a necessary accomplishment that would simplify the task of incorporating and verifying the photosynthetic function of the nanovehicle membrane, has proved to be difficult. The detailed understanding of the relative locations of surfactant and Pt in the liposomal bodies has also forced a change in the nanovehicle design strategies. Nevertheless, we have found no insurmountable obstacles to making these nanovehicles given a larger and longer term research effort. These nanovehicles could potentially respond to chemical gradients, light intensity, and field gradients, in the same manner that magnetic bacteria navigate. The cargo might include decision-making and guidance components, drugs and other biological and chemical agents, explosives, catalytic reactors, and structural materials.

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14 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2004-5955
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/920726 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 920726
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc901715

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  • December 1, 2004

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Dec. 5, 2016, 10:57 p.m.

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Singh, Anup K.; van Swol, Frank B.; Shelnutt, John Allen; Medforth, Craig J. & Song, Yujiang. LDRD final report on nanovehicle light-driven propulsion., report, December 1, 2004; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc901715/: accessed October 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.