Hierarchical Material Models for Fragmentation Modeling in NIF-ALE-AMR

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Fragmentation is a fundamental process that naturally spans micro to macroscopic scales. Recent advances in algorithms, computer simulations, and hardware enable us to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes in a real simulation through a heterogeneous multiscale mathematical model. We apply this model to the problem of predicting how targets in the NIF chamber dismantle, so that optics and diagnostics can be protected from damage. The mechanics of the initial material fracture depend on the microscopic grain structure. In order to effectively simulate the fragmentation, this process must be modeled at the subgrain level with computationally expensive crystal plasticity models. ... continued below

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6 p. (0.3 MB)

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Fisher, A C; Masters, N D; Dixit, P; Benson, D J; Koniges, A E; Anderson, R W et al. January 10, 2008.

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Fragmentation is a fundamental process that naturally spans micro to macroscopic scales. Recent advances in algorithms, computer simulations, and hardware enable us to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes in a real simulation through a heterogeneous multiscale mathematical model. We apply this model to the problem of predicting how targets in the NIF chamber dismantle, so that optics and diagnostics can be protected from damage. The mechanics of the initial material fracture depend on the microscopic grain structure. In order to effectively simulate the fragmentation, this process must be modeled at the subgrain level with computationally expensive crystal plasticity models. However, there are not enough computational resources to model the entire NIF target at this microscopic scale. In order to accomplish these calculations, a hierarchical material model (HMM) is being developed. The HMM will allow fine-scale modeling of the initial fragmentation using computationally expensive crystal plasticity, while the elements at the mesoscale can use polycrystal models, and the macroscopic elements use analytical flow stress models. The HMM framework is built upon an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability. We present progress in implementing the HMM in the NIF-ALE-AMR code. Additionally, we present test simulations relevant to NIF targets.

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6 p. (0.3 MB)

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PDF-file: 6 pages; size: 0.3 Mbytes

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  • Presented at: Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications, Kobe, Japan, Sep 09 - Sep 14, 2007

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  • Report No.: LLNL-CONF-400536
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 924608
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc901473

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • January 10, 2008

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • April 13, 2017, 6:21 p.m.

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Fisher, A C; Masters, N D; Dixit, P; Benson, D J; Koniges, A E; Anderson, R W et al. Hierarchical Material Models for Fragmentation Modeling in NIF-ALE-AMR, article, January 10, 2008; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc901473/: accessed October 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.