Multi-Probe Investigation of Proteomic Structure of Pathogens

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Complete genome sequences are available for understanding biotransformation, environmental resistance and pathogenesis of microbial, cellular and pathogen systems. The present technological and scientific challenges are to unravel the relationships between the organization and function of protein complexes at cell, microbial and pathogens surfaces, to understand how these complexes evolve during the bacterial, cellular and pathogen life cycles, and how they respond to environmental changes, chemical stimulants and therapeutics. In particular, elucidating the molecular structure and architecture of human pathogen surfaces is essential to understanding mechanisms of pathogenesis, immune response, physicochemical interactions, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. ... continued below

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Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; Vogelstein, B & Wheeler, K E January 24, 2008.

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Description

Complete genome sequences are available for understanding biotransformation, environmental resistance and pathogenesis of microbial, cellular and pathogen systems. The present technological and scientific challenges are to unravel the relationships between the organization and function of protein complexes at cell, microbial and pathogens surfaces, to understand how these complexes evolve during the bacterial, cellular and pathogen life cycles, and how they respond to environmental changes, chemical stimulants and therapeutics. In particular, elucidating the molecular structure and architecture of human pathogen surfaces is essential to understanding mechanisms of pathogenesis, immune response, physicochemical interactions, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. The objective of this project was to investigate the architecture, proteomic structure, and function of bacterial spores through a combination of high-resolution in vitro atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based immunolabeling with threat-specific antibodies. Particular attention in this project was focused on spore forming Bacillus species including the Sterne vaccine strain of Bacillus anthracis and the spore forming near-neighbor of Clostridium botulinum, C. novyi-NT. Bacillus species, including B. anthracis, the causative agent of inhalation anthrax are laboratory models for elucidating spore structure/function. Even though the complete genome sequence is available for B. subtilis, cereus, anthracis and other species, the determination and composition of spore structure/function is not understood. Prof. B. Vogelstein and colleagues at the John Hopkins University have recently developed a breakthrough bacteriolytic therapy for cancer treatment (1). They discovered that intravenously injected Clostridium novyi-NT spores germinate exclusively within the avascular regions of tumors in mice and destroy advanced cancerous lesions. The bacteria were also found to significantly improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs and radiotherapy (2,3). Currently, there is no understanding of the structure-function relationships of Clostridium novyi-NT spores. As well as their therapeutic interest, studies of Clostridium noyii spores could provide a model for further studies of human pathogenic spore formers including Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium perfringens. This project involved a multi-institutional collaboration of our LLNL group with the groups of Prof. T.J. Leighton (Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute) and Prof. B. Vogelstein (The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics at The John Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center).

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PDF-file: 8 pages; size: 59.9 Kbytes

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  • Report No.: LLNL-TR-400729
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • DOI: 10.2172/926009 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 926009
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc901214

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  • January 24, 2008

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Dec. 6, 2016, 1:44 p.m.

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Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; Vogelstein, B & Wheeler, K E. Multi-Probe Investigation of Proteomic Structure of Pathogens, report, January 24, 2008; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc901214/: accessed September 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.