Development of a CO2 Sequestration Module by Integrating Mineral Activation and Aqueous Carbonation

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Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw materials and the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates. The sequestration of CO{sub 2} through the employment of magnesium silicates--olivine and serpentine--is beyond the proof of concept stage. For the work done in this project, serpentine was chosen as the feedstock mineral due to its abundance and availability. Although the reactivity of olivine is greater than that of serpentine, physical and chemical treatments have been shown to increase greatly the reactivity of serpentine. The primary drawback ... continued below

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Alexander, George; Aksoy, Parvana; Andresen, John; Maroto-Valer, Mercedes & Schobert, Harold August 14, 2006.

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Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw materials and the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates. The sequestration of CO{sub 2} through the employment of magnesium silicates--olivine and serpentine--is beyond the proof of concept stage. For the work done in this project, serpentine was chosen as the feedstock mineral due to its abundance and availability. Although the reactivity of olivine is greater than that of serpentine, physical and chemical treatments have been shown to increase greatly the reactivity of serpentine. The primary drawback to mineral carbonation is reaction kinetics. To accelerate the carbonation, aqueous processes are preferred, where the minerals are first dissolved in solution. In aqueous carbonation, the key step is the dissolution rate of the mineral, where the mineral dissolution reaction is likely to be surface-controlled. The relatively low reactivity of serpentine has warranted research into physical and chemical treatments that have been shown to greatly increase its reactivity. The use of sulfuric acid as an accelerating medium for the removal of magnesium from serpentine has been investigated. To accelerate the dissolution process, the mineral can be ground to very fine particle size, <37 {micro}m, but this is a very energy-intensive process. Previous work in our laboratory showed that chemical surface activation helps to dissolve magnesium from the serpentine (of particle size {approx} 100 {micro}m) and that the carbonation reaction can be conducted under mild conditions (20 C and 4.6 MPa) compared to previous studies that required >185 C, >13 MPa, and <37 {micro}m particle size. This work also showed that over 70% of the magnesium can be extracted at ambient temperature, leaving an amorphous silica with surface area of about 330 m{sup 2}/g. The overall objective of this research program is to optimize the active carbonation process to design an integrated CO{sub 2} sequestration module. A parametric study was conducted to optimize conditions for mineral activation, in which serpentine and sulfuric acid were reacted. The study focused on the effects of varying the acid concentration, particle size, and reaction time. The reaction yield was as high as 48% with a 5 M acid concentration, with lower values directly corresponding to lower acid concentrations. Significant improvements in the removal of moisture, as well as in the dissolution, can be realized with comminution of particles to a D{sub 50} less than 125 ?m. A minimum threshold of 3 M concentration of sulfuric acid was found to exist in terms of removal of moisture from serpentine. The effect of reaction time was insignificant. The treated serpentine had low BET surface areas. Results demonstrated that acid concentration provided primary control on the dissolution via the removal of water, which is closely correlated with the extraction of magnesium from serpentine. Single-variable experimentation demonstrated dissolution enhancements with increased reaction time and temperature. An increase in magnesium dissolution of 46% and 70%, relative to a baseline test, occurred for increased reaction time and temperature, respectively. In addition to the challenges presented by the dissolution of serpentine, another challenge is the subsequent carbonation of the magnesium ions. A stable hydration sphere for the magnesium ion reduces the carbonation kinetics by obstructing the formation of the carbonation products. Accordingly, this research has evaluated the solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solution, the interaction between the dissociation products of carbon dioxide, and the carbonation potential of the magnesium ion.

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  • Report No.: None
  • Grant Number: FG26-03NT41809
  • DOI: 10.2172/923719 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 923719
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc900539

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  • August 14, 2006

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Nov. 23, 2016, 3:25 p.m.

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Alexander, George; Aksoy, Parvana; Andresen, John; Maroto-Valer, Mercedes & Schobert, Harold. Development of a CO2 Sequestration Module by Integrating Mineral Activation and Aqueous Carbonation, report, August 14, 2006; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc900539/: accessed September 25, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.