Control of Surface Mounted Permanent Magnet Motors with Special Application to Fractional-Slot Motors with Concentrated Windings

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A 30 pole, 6 kW, and 6000 maximum revolutions per minute (rpm) prototype of the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) with fractional-slot concentrated windings (FSCW) has been designed, built, and tested at the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UWM). This machine has significantly more inductance than that of regular PMSMs. The prototype was delivered in April 2006 to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing and development of a controller that will achieve maximum efficiency. In advance of the test/control development effort, ORNL has used the PMSM models developed over a number of previous studies to study how steady ... continued below

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McKeever, John W; Patil, Niranjan & Lawler, Jack July 1, 2007.

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A 30 pole, 6 kW, and 6000 maximum revolutions per minute (rpm) prototype of the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) with fractional-slot concentrated windings (FSCW) has been designed, built, and tested at the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UWM). This machine has significantly more inductance than that of regular PMSMs. The prototype was delivered in April 2006 to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing and development of a controller that will achieve maximum efficiency. In advance of the test/control development effort, ORNL has used the PMSM models developed over a number of previous studies to study how steady state performance of high inductance PMSM machines relates to control issues. This report documents the results of this research. The amount of inductance that enables the motor to achieve infinite constant power speed ratio (CPSR) is given by L{sub {infinity}} = E{sub b}/{Omega}{sub b}I{sub R}, where E{sub b} is the root-mean square (rms) magnitude of the line-to-neutral back-electromotive force (emf) at base speed, {Omega}{sub b} is the base speed in electrical radians per second, and I{sub R} is the rms current rating of the motor windings. The prototype machine that was delivered to ORNL has about 1.5 times as much inductance as a typical PMSM with distributed integral slot windings. The inventors of the FSCW method, who designed the prototype machine, remarked that they were 'too successful' in incorporating inductance into their machine and that steps would be taken to modify the design methodology to reduce the inductance to the optimum value. This study shows a significant advantage of having the higher inductance rather than the optimal value because it enables the motor to develop the required power at lower current thereby reducing motor and inverter losses and improving efficiency. The main problem found with high inductance machines driven by a conventional phase advance (CPA) method is that the motor current at high speed depends solely on machine parameters and is virtually independent of the load level and the direct current (dc) supply voltage. Thus, the motor current is virtually the same at no load as at full load resulting in poor efficiency at less than full load conditions. While an inductance higher than the value cited above is warranted, it still does not ensure that the motor current is proportional to load; consequently, the problem of low efficiency at high speed and partial load is not resolved but is only mitigated. A common definition of 'base speed' is the speed at which the voltage applied to the motor armature is equal to the magnitude of the back-emf. The results in this study indicate that the dc supply voltage should be adequate to drive rated current into the motor winding at the specified base speed. At a minimum this requires sufficient voltage to overcome not only the back-emf but also the voltage drop across the internal impedance of the machine. For a high inductance PMSM, the internal impedance at base speed can be considerable and substantial additional voltage is required to overcome the internal voltage drop. It is further shown that even more voltage than the minimum required for injecting rated current at base speed can be beneficial by allowing the required power to be developed at lower current, which reduces losses in the motor and inverter components. Further, it is shown that the current is minimized at a unique speed; consequently, there may be room for optimization if the drive spends a substantial amount of its operating life at a certain speed (for example 60 mph). In this study, fundamental frequency phasor models are developed for a synchronous PMSM and the control systems that drive them is CPA. The models were compared with detailed simulations to show their validity. The result was used to design a traction drive control system with optimized efficiency to drive the fractional-slot motor with concentrated windings. The goal is to meet or exceed the FreedomCAR inverter cost and performance targets.

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  • Report No.: ORNL/TM-2007/007
  • Grant Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725
  • DOI: 10.2172/931748 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 931748
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc899857

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  • July 1, 2007

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Oct. 31, 2016, 4:27 p.m.

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McKeever, John W; Patil, Niranjan & Lawler, Jack. Control of Surface Mounted Permanent Magnet Motors with Special Application to Fractional-Slot Motors with Concentrated Windings, report, July 1, 2007; [Tennessee]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc899857/: accessed November 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.