Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondaryaccumulation at shallow depth

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Geologic storage of CO2 can be a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases only if it can bedemonstrated that leakage from proposed storage reservoirs and associatedhazards are small or can be mitigated. Risk assessment must evaluatepotential leakage scenarios and develop a rational, mechanisticunderstanding of CO2 behavior during leakage. Flow of CO2 may be subjectto positive feedbacks that could amplify leakage risks and hazards,placing a premium on identifying and avoiding adverse conditions andmechanisms. A scenario that is unfavorable in terms of leakage behavioris formation of a secondary CO2 accumulation at shallow depth. This paperdevelops a detailed numerical simulation model ... continued below

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Pruess, K. May 31, 2007.

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Geologic storage of CO2 can be a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases only if it can bedemonstrated that leakage from proposed storage reservoirs and associatedhazards are small or can be mitigated. Risk assessment must evaluatepotential leakage scenarios and develop a rational, mechanisticunderstanding of CO2 behavior during leakage. Flow of CO2 may be subjectto positive feedbacks that could amplify leakage risks and hazards,placing a premium on identifying and avoiding adverse conditions andmechanisms. A scenario that is unfavorable in terms of leakage behavioris formation of a secondary CO2 accumulation at shallow depth. This paperdevelops a detailed numerical simulation model to investigate CO2discharge from a secondary accumulation, and evaluates the role ofdifferent thermodynamic and hydrogeologic conditions. Our simulationsdemonstrate self-enhancing as well as self-limiting feedbacks.Condensation of gaseous CO2, 3-phase flow of aqueous phase -- liquid CO2-- gaseous CO2, and cooling from Joule-Thomson expansion and boiling ofliquid CO2 are found to play important roles in the behavior of a CO2leakage system. We find no evidence that a subsurface accumulation of CO2at ambient temperatures could give rise to a high-energy discharge, aso-called "pneumatic eruption."

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  • Journal Name: International Journal of Greenhouse GasControl; Journal Volume: 0; Journal Issue: 0; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 0

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  • Report No.: LBNL--63354
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 929335
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc899803

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  • May 31, 2007

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Sept. 29, 2016, 3:04 p.m.

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Pruess, K. Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondaryaccumulation at shallow depth, article, May 31, 2007; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc899803/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.