Spatiotemporal variations in growing season exchanges of CO2, H2O,and sensible heat in agricultural fields of the Southern GreatPlains Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title Spatiotemporal variations in growing season exchanges of CO2, H2O,and sensible heat in agricultural fields of the Southern GreatPlains

Creator

  • Author: Fischer, Marc L.
    Creator Type: Personal
  • Author: Billesbach, David P.
    Creator Type: Personal
  • Author: Berry, Joseph A.
    Creator Type: Personal
  • Author: Riley,William J.
    Creator Type: Personal
  • Author: Torn, Margaret S.
    Creator Type: Personal

Contributor

  • Sponsor: United States. Department of Energy. Office of Biological and Environmental Research.
    Contributor Type: Organization
    Contributor Info: USDOE Director. Office of Science. Biological and Environmental Research

Publisher

  • Name: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Place of Publication: Berkeley, California
    Additional Info: "Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)"

Date

  • Creation: 2007-06-13

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: Climate, vegetation cover, and management create fine-scaleheterogeneity in unirrigated agricultural regions, with important but notwell-quantified consequences for spatial and temporal variations insurface CO2, water, and heat fluxes. We measured eddy covariance fluxesin seven agricultural fields--comprising winter wheat, pasture, andsorghum--in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) during the 2001-2003growing seasons. Land-cover was the dominant source of variation insurface fluxes, with 50-100 percent differences between fields planted inwinter-spring versus fields planted in summer. Interannual variation wasdriven mainly by precipitation, which varied more than two-fold betweenyears. Peak aboveground biomass and growing-season net ecosystem exchange(NEE) of CO2 increased in rough proportion to precipitation. Based on apartitioning of gross fluxes with a regression model, ecosystemrespiration increased linearly with gross primary production, but with anoffset that increased near the time of seed production. Because theregression model was designed for well-watered periods, it successfullyretrieved NEE and ecosystem parameters during the peak growing season,and identified periods of moisture limitation during the summer. Insummary, the effects of crop type, land management, and water limitationon carbon, water, and energy fluxes were large. Capturing the controllingfactors in landscape scale models will be necessary to estimate theecological feedbacks to climate and other environmental impactsassociated with changing human needs for agricultural production of food,fiber, and energy.

Subject

  • Keyword: Climate Change And Carbon Management Terrestrial Carbonagriculture Carbon Dioxide Carbon Cycle Co2 Flux Land Use Spatial Scalingsouthern Great Plains Wheat
  • STI Subject Categories: 54 Climate Change And Carbon Management Terrestrial Carbonagriculture Carbon Dioxide Carbon Cycle Co2 Flux Land Use Spatial Scalingsouthern Great Plains Wheat

Source

  • Journal Name: Earth Interactions; Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 17; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: Oct. 2007

Collection

  • Name: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports
    Code: OSTI

Institution

  • Name: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
    Code: UNTGD

Resource Type

  • Article

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • Report No.: LBNL--63014
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • DOI: 10.1175/EI231.1
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 926902
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc899787