Physics Design of the National High-Power Advanced Torus eXperiment

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Moving beyond ITER toward a demonstration power reactor (Demo) will require the integration of stable high fusion gain in steady-state, advanced methods for dissipating very high divertor heat-fluxes, and adherence to strict limits on in-vessel tritium retention. While ITER will clearly address the issue of high fusion gain, and new and planned long-pulse experiments (EAST, JT60-SA, KSTAR, SST-1) will collectively address stable steady-state high-performance operation, none of these devices will adequately address the integrated heat-flux, tritium retention, and plasma performance requirements needed for extrapolation to Demo. Expressing power exhaust requirements in terms of P{sub heat}/R, future ARIES reactors are projected ... continued below

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6 p. (0.4 MB)

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Menard, J; Goldston, R; Fu, G; Gorelenkov, N; Kaye, S; Kramer, G et al. July 2, 2007.

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Moving beyond ITER toward a demonstration power reactor (Demo) will require the integration of stable high fusion gain in steady-state, advanced methods for dissipating very high divertor heat-fluxes, and adherence to strict limits on in-vessel tritium retention. While ITER will clearly address the issue of high fusion gain, and new and planned long-pulse experiments (EAST, JT60-SA, KSTAR, SST-1) will collectively address stable steady-state high-performance operation, none of these devices will adequately address the integrated heat-flux, tritium retention, and plasma performance requirements needed for extrapolation to Demo. Expressing power exhaust requirements in terms of P{sub heat}/R, future ARIES reactors are projected to operate with 60-200MW/m, a Component Test Facility (CTF) or Fusion Development Facility (FDF) for nuclear component testing (NCT) with 40-50MW/m, and ITER 20-25MW/m. However, new and planned long-pulse experiments are currently projected to operate at values of P{sub heat}/R no more than 16MW/m. Furthermore, none of the existing or planned experiments are capable of operating with very high temperature first-wall (T{sub wall} = 600-1000C) which may be critical for understanding and ultimately minimizing tritium retention with a reactor-relevant metallic first-wall. The considerable gap between present and near-term experiments and the performance needed for NCT and Demo motivates the development of the concept for a new experiment--the National High-power advanced-Torus eXperiment (NHTX)--whose mission is to study the integration of a fusion-relevant plasma-material interface with stable steady-state high-performance plasma operation. Such a device would not have a high-fluence NCT mission, but would advance the science and technology necessary to accelerate the NCT mission at reduced risk in a separate nuclear facility. For the NHTX mission, flexibility to test multiple divertor configurations and first-wall components is critical, and flexibility in plasma exhaust configuration and boundary shape is important for understanding the plasma-wall interaction. Sufficient profile control must be available to generate high-performance fully non-inductive plasmas with high P{sub heat}/R {le} 50MW/m and long pulses=200-1000s. Incorporation of hot walls, trace-tritium, liquid metals, and ELM and disruption control are additional design goals.

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6 p. (0.4 MB)

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PDF-file: 6 pages; size: 0.4 Mbytes

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  • Presented at: 34th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics, Warsaw, Poland, Jul 02 - Jul 06, 2007

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  • Report No.: UCRL-CONF-232418
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 920879
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc899752

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • July 2, 2007

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • April 17, 2017, 12:20 p.m.

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Menard, J; Goldston, R; Fu, G; Gorelenkov, N; Kaye, S; Kramer, G et al. Physics Design of the National High-Power Advanced Torus eXperiment, article, July 2, 2007; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc899752/: accessed October 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.