Electrostatic Dust Detection and Removal for ITER

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We present some recent results on two innovative applications of microelectronics technology to dust inventory measurement and dust removal in ITER. A novel device to detect the settling of dust particles on a remote surface has been developed in the laboratory. A circuit board with a grid of two interlocking conductive traces with 25 μm spacing is biased to 30 – 50 V. Carbon particles landing on the energized grid create a transient short circuit. The current flowing through the short circuit creates a voltage pulse that is recorded by standard nuclear counting electronics and the total number of counts ... continued below

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Skinner, C.H.; Campos, A.; Kugel, H.; Leisure, J.; Roquemore, A.L. & Wagner, S. September 1, 2008.

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We present some recent results on two innovative applications of microelectronics technology to dust inventory measurement and dust removal in ITER. A novel device to detect the settling of dust particles on a remote surface has been developed in the laboratory. A circuit board with a grid of two interlocking conductive traces with 25 μm spacing is biased to 30 – 50 V. Carbon particles landing on the energized grid create a transient short circuit. The current flowing through the short circuit creates a voltage pulse that is recorded by standard nuclear counting electronics and the total number of counts is related to the mass of dust impinging on the grid. The particles typically vaporize in a few seconds restoring the previous voltage standoff. Experience on NSTX however, showed that in a tokamak environment it was still possible for large particles or fibers to remain on the grid causing a long term short circuit. We report on the development of a gas puff system that uses helium to clear such particles. Experiments with varying nozzle designs, backing pressures, puff durations, and exit flow orientations have given an optimal configuration that effectively removes particles from an area up to 25 cm² with a single nozzle. In a separate experiment we are developing an advanced circuit grid of three interlocking traces that can generate a miniature electrostatic traveling wave for transporting dust to a suitable exit port. We have fabricated such a 3-pole circuit board with 25 micron insulated traces that operates with voltages up to 200 V. Recent results showed motion of dust particles with the application of only 50 V bias voltage. Such a device could potentially remove dust continuously without dedicated interventions and without loss of machine availability for plasma operations.

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  • Twenty-Second IAEA Fusion Energy Conference - 50th Anniversary of Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 13 - 18 October 2008, Geneva, Switzerland.

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  • Report No.: PPPL-4351
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-76CH03073
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 938797
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc898236

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • September 1, 2008

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Nov. 18, 2016, 10 p.m.

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Skinner, C.H.; Campos, A.; Kugel, H.; Leisure, J.; Roquemore, A.L. & Wagner, S. Electrostatic Dust Detection and Removal for ITER, article, September 1, 2008; Princeton, New Jersey. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc898236/: accessed November 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.