Tracing Geothermal Fluids

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Description

Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive ... continued below

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Adams, Michael C. & Nash, Greg March 1, 2004.

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Description

Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

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9 Mbytes

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  • Report No.: DOE-ID13891-EGI
  • Grant Number: FG36-00ID13891
  • DOI: 10.2172/928987 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 928987
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc898033

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  • March 1, 2004

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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Adams, Michael C. & Nash, Greg. Tracing Geothermal Fluids, report, March 1, 2004; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc898033/: accessed August 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.