Development of a Multi Megawatt Circulator for X Band

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Research is in progress on a TeV-scale linear collider that will operate at 5-10 times the energy of present-generation accelerators. This will require development of high power RF sources generating of 50-100 MW per source. Transmission of power at this level requires overmoded waveguide to avoid breakdown. In particular, the TE{sub 01} circular waveguide mode is currently the mode of choice for waveguide transmission at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the Multimode Delay Line Distribution System (MDLDS). A common device for protecting an RF source from reflected power is the waveguide circulator. A circulator is typically a three-port device ... continued below

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Neilson, J.; Ives, L. & Tantawi, S. G. March 24, 2008.

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Research is in progress on a TeV-scale linear collider that will operate at 5-10 times the energy of present-generation accelerators. This will require development of high power RF sources generating of 50-100 MW per source. Transmission of power at this level requires overmoded waveguide to avoid breakdown. In particular, the TE{sub 01} circular waveguide mode is currently the mode of choice for waveguide transmission at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the Multimode Delay Line Distribution System (MDLDS). A common device for protecting an RF source from reflected power is the waveguide circulator. A circulator is typically a three-port device that allows low loss power transmission from the source to the load, but diverts power coming from the load (reflected power) to a third terminated port. To achieve a low loss, matched, three port junction requires nonreciprocal behavior. This is achieved using ferrites in a static magnetic field which introduces a propagation constant dependent on RF field direction relative to the static magnetic field. Circulators are currently available at X-Band for power levels up to 1 MW in fundamental rectangular waveguide; however, the next generation of RF sources for TeV-level accelerators will require circulators in the 50-100 MW range. Clearly, conventional technology is not capable of reaching the power level required. In this paper, we discuss the development of an X-Band circulator operating at multi-megawatt power levels in overmoded waveguide. The circulator will employ an innovative coaxial geometry using the TE{sub 01} mode. Difficulties in maintaining mode purity in oversized rectangular guide preclude increasing guide area to allow increasing the power level to the desired 50-100 MW range. The TE{sub 01} mode in circular waveguide is very robust mode for transmission of high power in overmoded waveguide. The mode is ideal for transmission of high power microwaves because of its low-losses, zero tangential field on the guide (which minimizes arcing problems) and reduced propensity for mode conversion compared to non-asymmetric circular waveguide modes. Unfortunately, no current designs exist for circulators using the circular TE{sub 01} mode. The basic building block for all low-loss circulators and isolators is a nonreciprocal element with a phase shift dependent on the propagation direction in the guide. Such an element can be constructed by placement of a hollow ferrite rod in a cylindrical waveguide. An inner conductor placed inside the ferrite rod conducts a current pulse that induces an azimuthal magnetic field inside the ferrite. This configuration is depicted in Figure 1a. An alternate configuration using permanent magnets is shown in Figure 1b. Either of these configurations will create a different phase shift for waves propagating in opposite directions along the waveguide axis. This feature can be used to develop a high power circulator. We are currently testing a TE{sub 01} nonreciprocal phase shifter in a 50 MW test stand. This device is in the configuration shown in Figure 1a. The induced differential phase shift and loss will be measured and compared to calculations.

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  • Journal Name: Conf.Proc.C030512:1127,2003; Conference: Particle Accelerator Conference (PAC 03) 12-16 May 2003, Portland, Oregon

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  • Report No.: SLAC-PUB-13185
  • Grant Number: AC02-76SF00515
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 926195
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc897847

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  • March 24, 2008

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Aug. 1, 2017, 11:51 a.m.

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Neilson, J.; Ives, L. & Tantawi, S. G. Development of a Multi Megawatt Circulator for X Band, article, March 24, 2008; [Menlo Park, California]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc897847/: accessed December 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.