Dynamic Imaging of Surface Motion with a Stereo Borescope

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A new stereo borescope has been investigated that would provide a time-resolved calibrated method of recording the motion and deformation of a three-dimensional (3-D) surface during explosively driven dynamic shock experiments at the Nevada Test Site. In these experiments, geometries would likely prove to be incompatible with conventional direct optical systems. Single line-of-sight borescopes lack adequate depth-of-field for quantitative imaging of the 3-D surface. To improve depth-of-field and provide time resolution, a stereo borescope has been fabricated for use with a nine-frame framing camera. At one end, stereo optics couple light from the dynamic surface into a pair of flexible ... continued below

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Michael Berninger, Stuart Baker December 11, 2008.

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A new stereo borescope has been investigated that would provide a time-resolved calibrated method of recording the motion and deformation of a three-dimensional (3-D) surface during explosively driven dynamic shock experiments at the Nevada Test Site. In these experiments, geometries would likely prove to be incompatible with conventional direct optical systems. Single line-of-sight borescopes lack adequate depth-of-field for quantitative imaging of the 3-D surface. To improve depth-of-field and provide time resolution, a stereo borescope has been fabricated for use with a nine-frame framing camera. At one end, stereo optics couple light from the dynamic surface into a pair of flexible 1-mm-diameter correlated fiber-optic bundles. At the other end, small-format lenses (~3 mm) interface with the framing camera, which is set up to simultaneously record the separate-perspective views. All nine frames could be recorded in a period as short as 1.8 μs, and spatial resolution is optimized to 11 line-pairs per mm. To achieve pseudo 3-D depth perception, photogrammetric analysis has been demonstrated with commercial software from ADAM technology (Australia). This paper presents the results from time-resolved stereo images of dynamic surfaces collected in a series of high-explosives experiments at the National Security Technologies, LLC, “Boom Box” in Santa Barbara, CA. Experience with the stereo borescope has suggested other potentially useful stereoscopic applications, such as stereo viewing of moving surfaces on the interiors of engines and the heating of moving components, and the viewing material deposition on interior surfaces during machine operations and fabrication processes.

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  • 56th Defense Working Group on Nondestructive Testing; December 9-11, 2008; San Diego, CA

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  • Report No.: DOE/NV/25946--562
  • Grant Number: DE-AC52-06NA25946
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 942305
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc897449

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • December 11, 2008

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Dec. 16, 2016, 12:35 p.m.

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Michael Berninger, Stuart Baker. Dynamic Imaging of Surface Motion with a Stereo Borescope, article, December 11, 2008; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc897449/: accessed January 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.