Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 3 - Case Study on an ITEquipment-testing Center (No. 20)

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The data center in this study had a total floor area of 3,024 square feet (ft{sup 2}) with one-foot raised-floors. It was a rack lab with 147 racks, and was located in a 96,000 ft{sup 2} multi-story office building in San Jose, California. Since the data center was used only for testing equipment, it was not configured as a critical facility in terms of electrical and cooling supply. It did not have a dedicated chiller system but was served by the main building chiller plant and make-up air system. Additionally it was served by only a single electrical supply with ... continued below

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Xu, Tengfang & Greenberg, Steve July 1, 2007.

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The data center in this study had a total floor area of 3,024 square feet (ft{sup 2}) with one-foot raised-floors. It was a rack lab with 147 racks, and was located in a 96,000 ft{sup 2} multi-story office building in San Jose, California. Since the data center was used only for testing equipment, it was not configured as a critical facility in terms of electrical and cooling supply. It did not have a dedicated chiller system but was served by the main building chiller plant and make-up air system. Additionally it was served by only a single electrical supply with no provision for backup power in the event of a power outage. The Data Center operated on a 24 hour per day, year-round cycle, and users had full-hour access to the data center facility. The study found that data center computer load accounted for 15% of the overall building electrical load, while the total power consumption attributable to the data center including allocated cooling load and lighting was 22% of the total facility load. The density of installed computer loads (rack load) in the data center was 61 W/ft{sup 2}. Power consumption density for all data center allocated load (including cooling and lighting) was 88 W/ft{sup 2}, approximately eight times the average overall power density in rest of the building (non-data center portion). The building and its data center cooling system was provided with various energy optimizing systems that included the following: (1) Varying chilled water flow rate through variable speed drives on the primary pumps. (2) No energy losses due to nonexistence of UPS or standby generators. (3) Minimized under-floor obstruction that affects the delivery efficiency of supply air. (4) Elimination of dehumidification/humidification within the CRAH units. For the data center, 70% of the overall electric power was the rack critical loads, 14% of the power was consumed by chillers, 12% by CRAH units, 2% by lighting system, and about 2% of the power was consumed by chilled water pumps. General recommendations for improving overall data center energy efficiency include improving the lighting control, airflow optimization, control of mechanical systems serving the data center in actual operation.. This includes chilled water system, airflow management and control in the data center. Additional specific recommendations or considerations to improve energy efficiency are provided in this report.

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  • Report No.: LBNL--62716-Pt.-3
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • DOI: 10.2172/928869 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 928869
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc897386

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  • July 1, 2007

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Sept. 30, 2016, 1:05 p.m.

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Xu, Tengfang & Greenberg, Steve. Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 3 - Case Study on an ITEquipment-testing Center (No. 20), report, July 1, 2007; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc897386/: accessed August 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.