Studies on the disbonding initiation of interfacial cracks.

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With the continuing trend of decreasing feature sizes in flip-chip assemblies, the reliability tolerance to interfacial flaws is also decreasing. Small-scale disbonds will become more of a concern, pointing to the need for a better understanding of the initiation stage of interfacial delamination. With most accepted adhesion metric methodologies tailored to predict failure under the prior existence of a disbond, the study of the initiation phenomenon is open to development and standardization of new testing procedures. Traditional fracture mechanics approaches are not suitable, as the mathematics assume failure to originate at a disbond or crack tip. Disbond initiation is believed ... continued below

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50 p.

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McAdams, Brian J. (Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA) & Pearson, Raymond A. (Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA) August 1, 2005.

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Description

With the continuing trend of decreasing feature sizes in flip-chip assemblies, the reliability tolerance to interfacial flaws is also decreasing. Small-scale disbonds will become more of a concern, pointing to the need for a better understanding of the initiation stage of interfacial delamination. With most accepted adhesion metric methodologies tailored to predict failure under the prior existence of a disbond, the study of the initiation phenomenon is open to development and standardization of new testing procedures. Traditional fracture mechanics approaches are not suitable, as the mathematics assume failure to originate at a disbond or crack tip. Disbond initiation is believed to first occur at free edges and corners, which act as high stress concentration sites and exhibit singular stresses similar to a crack tip, though less severe in intensity. As such, a 'fracture mechanics-like' approach may be employed which defines a material parameter--a critical stress intensity factor (K{sub c})--that can be used to predict when initiation of a disbond at an interface will occur. The factors affecting the adhesion of underfill/polyimide interfaces relevant to flip-chip assemblies were investigated in this study. The study consisted of two distinct parts: a comparison of the initiation and propagation phenomena and a comparison of the relationship between sub-critical and critical initiation of interfacial failure. The initiation of underfill interfacial failure was studied by characterizing failure at a free-edge with a critical stress intensity factor. In comparison with the interfacial fracture toughness testing, it was shown that a good correlation exists between the initiation and propagation of interfacial failures. Such a correlation justifies the continuing use of fracture mechanics to predict the reliability of flip-chip packages. The second aspect of the research involved fatigue testing of tensile butt joint specimens to determine lifetimes at sub-critical load levels. The results display an interfacial strength ranking similar to that observed during monotonic testing. The fatigue results indicate that monotonic fracture mechanics testing may be an adequate screening tool to help predict cyclic underfill failure; however lifetime data is required to predict reliability.

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50 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2005-4749
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/923175 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 923175
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc896725

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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Creation Date

  • August 1, 2005

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Dec. 2, 2016, 12:57 p.m.

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McAdams, Brian J. (Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA) & Pearson, Raymond A. (Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA). Studies on the disbonding initiation of interfacial cracks., report, August 1, 2005; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc896725/: accessed September 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.