Markov Random Field Based Automatic Image Alignment for ElectronTomography

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Cryo electron tomography (cryo-ET) is the primary method for obtaining 3D reconstructions of intact bacteria, viruses, and complex molecular machines ([7],[2]). It first flash freezes a specimen in a thin layer of ice, and then rotates the ice sheet in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) recording images of different projections through the sample. The resulting images are aligned and then back projected to form the desired 3-D model. The typical resolution of biological electron microscope is on the order of 1 nm per pixel which means that small imprecision in the microscope's stage or lenses can cause large alignment errors. ... continued below

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Moussavi, Farshid; Amat, Fernando; Comolli, Luis R.; Elidan, Gal; Downing, Kenneth H. & Horowitz, Mark November 30, 2007.

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Cryo electron tomography (cryo-ET) is the primary method for obtaining 3D reconstructions of intact bacteria, viruses, and complex molecular machines ([7],[2]). It first flash freezes a specimen in a thin layer of ice, and then rotates the ice sheet in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) recording images of different projections through the sample. The resulting images are aligned and then back projected to form the desired 3-D model. The typical resolution of biological electron microscope is on the order of 1 nm per pixel which means that small imprecision in the microscope's stage or lenses can cause large alignment errors. To enable a high precision alignment, biologists add a small number of spherical gold beads to the sample before it is frozen. These beads generate high contrast dots in the image that can be tracked across projections. Each gold bead can be seen as a marker with a fixed location in 3D, which provides the reference points to bring all the images to a common frame as in the classical structure from motion problem. A high accuracy alignment is critical to obtain a high resolution tomogram (usually on the order of 5-15nm resolution). While some methods try to automate the task of tracking markers and aligning the images ([8],[4]), they require user intervention if the SNR of the image becomes too low. Unfortunately, cryogenic electron tomography (or cryo-ET) often has poor SNR, since the samples are relatively thick (for TEM) and the restricted electron dose usually results in projections with SNR under 0 dB. This paper shows that formulating this problem as a most-likely estimation task yields an approach that is able to automatically align with high precision cryo-ET datasets using inference in graphical models. This approach has been packaged into a publicly available software called RAPTOR-Robust Alignment and Projection estimation for Tomographic Reconstruction.

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  • Neural Information Processing Systems Conference,Hyatt Regency, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, December 3-6,2007

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  • Report No.: LBNL--63633
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 925600
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc896693

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  • November 30, 2007

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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Moussavi, Farshid; Amat, Fernando; Comolli, Luis R.; Elidan, Gal; Downing, Kenneth H. & Horowitz, Mark. Markov Random Field Based Automatic Image Alignment for ElectronTomography, article, November 30, 2007; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc896693/: accessed November 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.