Photonic encryption : modeling and functional analysis of all optical logic.

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With the build-out of large transport networks utilizing optical technologies, more and more capacity is being made available. Innovations in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) and the elimination of optical-electrical-optical conversions have brought on advances in communication speeds as we move into 10 Gigabit Ethernet and above. Of course, there is a need to encrypt data on these optical links as the data traverses public and private network backbones. Unfortunately, as the communications infrastructure becomes increasingly optical, advances in encryption (done electronically) have failed to keep up. This project examines the use of optical logic for implementing encryption in the ... continued below

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38 p.

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Tang, Jason D.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree & Robertson, Perry J. October 1, 2004.

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Description

With the build-out of large transport networks utilizing optical technologies, more and more capacity is being made available. Innovations in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) and the elimination of optical-electrical-optical conversions have brought on advances in communication speeds as we move into 10 Gigabit Ethernet and above. Of course, there is a need to encrypt data on these optical links as the data traverses public and private network backbones. Unfortunately, as the communications infrastructure becomes increasingly optical, advances in encryption (done electronically) have failed to keep up. This project examines the use of optical logic for implementing encryption in the photonic domain to achieve the requisite encryption rates. This paper documents the innovations and advances of work first detailed in 'Photonic Encryption using All Optical Logic,' [1]. A discussion of underlying concepts can be found in SAND2003-4474. In order to realize photonic encryption designs, technology developed for electrical logic circuits must be translated to the photonic regime. This paper examines S-SEED devices and how discrete logic elements can be interconnected and cascaded to form an optical circuit. Because there is no known software that can model these devices at a circuit level, the functionality of S-SEED devices in an optical circuit was modeled in PSpice. PSpice allows modeling of the macro characteristics of the devices in context of a logic element as opposed to device level computational modeling. By representing light intensity as voltage, 'black box' models are generated that accurately represent the intensity response and logic levels in both technologies. By modeling the behavior at the systems level, one can incorporate systems design tools and a simulation environment to aid in the overall functional design. Each black box model takes certain parameters (reflectance, intensity, input response), and models the optical ripple and time delay characteristics. These 'black box' models are interconnected and cascaded in an encrypting/scrambling algorithm based on a study of candidate encryption algorithms. Demonstration circuits show how these logic elements can be used to form NAND, NOR, and XOR functions. This paper also presents functional analysis of a serial, low gate count demonstration algorithm suitable for scrambling/encryption using S-SEED devices.

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38 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2004-5275
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/920119 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 920119
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc896544

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  • October 1, 2004

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Nov. 30, 2016, 4:44 p.m.

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Tang, Jason D.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree & Robertson, Perry J. Photonic encryption : modeling and functional analysis of all optical logic., report, October 1, 2004; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc896544/: accessed August 16, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.