Dust Studies in DIII-D Tokamak

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Studies of submicron dust using Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers and video data of micron to sub-millimeter sized dust on DIII-D tokamak have provided the first data of dust sources and transport during tokamak discharges. During normal operation on DIII-D dust observation rates are low, a few events per discharge or less. The net carbon content of the dust corresponds to a carbon atom density a few orders of magnitude below the core impurity density. Statistical analysis of Mie data collected over months of operation reveal correlation of increased dust rate with increased heating power and impulsive wall loading due ... continued below

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6 p. (0.3 MB)

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Rudakov, D L; West, W P; Groth, M; Yu, J H; Boedo, J A; Bray, B D et al. April 15, 2008.

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Studies of submicron dust using Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers and video data of micron to sub-millimeter sized dust on DIII-D tokamak have provided the first data of dust sources and transport during tokamak discharges. During normal operation on DIII-D dust observation rates are low, a few events per discharge or less. The net carbon content of the dust corresponds to a carbon atom density a few orders of magnitude below the core impurity density. Statistical analysis of Mie data collected over months of operation reveal correlation of increased dust rate with increased heating power and impulsive wall loading due to edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions. Generation of significant amounts of dust by disruptions is confirmed by the camera data. However, dust production by disruptions alone is insufficient to account for estimated in-vessel dust inventory in DIII-D. After an extended entry vent, thousands of dust particles are observed by cameras in the first 2-3 plasma discharges. Individual particles moving at velocities up to {approx}300 m/s, breakup of larger particles into pieces, and collisions of particles with walls are observed. After {approx}70 discharges, dust levels are reduced to a few events per discharge. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark modeling, milligram amounts of micron-sized carbon dust have been injected into DIII-D discharges, leading to the core carbon density increase by a factor of 2-3. Following injection, dust trajectories in the divertor are mostly in the toroidal direction, consistent with the ion drag force. Dust from the injection is observed in the outboard midplane by a fast framing camera. The observed trajectories and velocities of the dust particles are in qualitative agreement with modeling by the 3D DustT code.

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6 p. (0.3 MB)

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PDF-file: 6 pages; size: 0.3 Mbytes

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  • Presented at: 5th International Conference on Physics of Dusty Plasmas 2008, Ponta Delgada, Portugal, May 18 - May 23, 2008

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  • Report No.: LLNL-CONF-403006
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 945142
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc896407

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  • April 15, 2008

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • April 13, 2017, 6:21 p.m.

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Rudakov, D L; West, W P; Groth, M; Yu, J H; Boedo, J A; Bray, B D et al. Dust Studies in DIII-D Tokamak, article, April 15, 2008; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc896407/: accessed June 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.