NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES CONTINUOUS MELTING AND BULK VITRIFICAITON

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Description

This contribution addresses various aspects of nuclear waste vitrification. Nuclear wastes have a variety of components and composition ranges. For each waste composition, the glass must be formulated to possess acceptable processing and product behavior defined in terms of physical and chemical properties that guarantee the glass can be easily made and resist environmental degradation. Glass formulation is facilitated by developing property-composition models, and the strategy of model development and application is reviewed. However, the large variability of waste compositions presents numerous additional challenges: insoluble solids and molten salts may segregate; foam may hinder heat transfer and slow down the ... continued below

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AA, KRUGER & PR, HRMA March 24, 2008.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Hanford Site (Wash.)
    Publisher Info: Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA
    Place of Publication: Richland, Washington

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Description

This contribution addresses various aspects of nuclear waste vitrification. Nuclear wastes have a variety of components and composition ranges. For each waste composition, the glass must be formulated to possess acceptable processing and product behavior defined in terms of physical and chemical properties that guarantee the glass can be easily made and resist environmental degradation. Glass formulation is facilitated by developing property-composition models, and the strategy of model development and application is reviewed. However, the large variability of waste compositions presents numerous additional challenges: insoluble solids and molten salts may segregate; foam may hinder heat transfer and slow down the process; molten salts may accumulate in container refractory walls; the glass on cooling may precipitate crystalline phases. These problems need targeted exploratory research. Examples of specific problems and their possible solutions are discussed.

Source

  • 9TH ESG CONFERENCE WITH THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ICG (INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON GLASS) EUROPEAN SOCIETY IF GLASS 06/22/2008 THRU 06/26/2008 TRENCIN CZECH REPUBLIC

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  • Report No.: ORP-37171-FP Rev 0
  • Grant Number: DE-AC06-96RL13200
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 926196
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc896235

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Creation Date

  • March 24, 2008

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Nov. 1, 2016, 11:56 a.m.

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AA, KRUGER & PR, HRMA. NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES CONTINUOUS MELTING AND BULK VITRIFICAITON, article, March 24, 2008; Richland, Washington. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc896235/: accessed September 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.