Gas-Crossover and Membrane-Pinhole Effects in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells

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This paper investigates the effects of gas crossover. Specifically, mathematical simulations are conducted to elucidate the fundamental changes in fuel-cell operation as permeation of the various gases through the membrane increases. Two cases are explored, with the first one examining uniform increases in the set of gas-permeation coefficients, and the second one the existence of regions of high gas crossover (i.e., membrane pinholes). For the first case, operation at 120 C is studied and a maximum limit for the hydrogen permeation coefficient of 1 x 10{sup -10} mol/bar-cm-s for a 25 {micro}m membrane is determined. For the second case, it ... continued below

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Weber, Adam & Weber, Adam Z. April 1, 2008.

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This paper investigates the effects of gas crossover. Specifically, mathematical simulations are conducted to elucidate the fundamental changes in fuel-cell operation as permeation of the various gases through the membrane increases. Two cases are explored, with the first one examining uniform increases in the set of gas-permeation coefficients, and the second one the existence of regions of high gas crossover (i.e., membrane pinholes). For the first case, operation at 120 C is studied and a maximum limit for the hydrogen permeation coefficient of 1 x 10{sup -10} mol/bar-cm-s for a 25 {micro}m membrane is determined. For the second case, it is shown that negative current densities and temperature spikes can arise due to mixed-potential and direct-combustion effects where there are large enough pinholes, thereby impacting performance and water and thermal management.

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  • Journal Name: Electrochemical Society

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  • Report No.: LBNL-368E
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • DOI: 10.1149/1.2898130 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 929725
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc896216

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  • April 1, 2008

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Jan. 4, 2017, 5:50 p.m.

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Weber, Adam & Weber, Adam Z. Gas-Crossover and Membrane-Pinhole Effects in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells, article, April 1, 2008; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc896216/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.