Role of a Transcriptional Regulator in Programmed Cell Death and Plant Development

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The long-term goal of this research is to understand the role(s) and molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD) in the controlling plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. We developed a genetic selection scheme to identify A. thaliana FB1-resistant (fbr) mutants as a way to find genes involved in PCD (Stone et al., 2000; Stone et al., 2005; Khan and Stone, 2008). The disrupted gene in fbr6 (AtSPL14) responsible for the FB1-insensitivity and plant architecture phenotypes encodes a plant-specific SBP DNA-binding domain transcriptional regulator (Stone et al., 2005; Liang et al., 2008). This research plan is ... continued below

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Stone, Julie M. September 13, 2008.

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The long-term goal of this research is to understand the role(s) and molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD) in the controlling plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. We developed a genetic selection scheme to identify A. thaliana FB1-resistant (fbr) mutants as a way to find genes involved in PCD (Stone et al., 2000; Stone et al., 2005; Khan and Stone, 2008). The disrupted gene in fbr6 (AtSPL14) responsible for the FB1-insensitivity and plant architecture phenotypes encodes a plant-specific SBP DNA-binding domain transcriptional regulator (Stone et al., 2005; Liang et al., 2008). This research plan is designed to fill gaps in the knowledge about the role of SPL14 in plant growth and development. The work is being guided by three objectives aimed at determining the pathways in which SPL14 functions to modulate PCD and/or plant development: (1) determine how SPL14 functions in plant development, (2) identify target genes that are directly regulated by SPL14, and (3) identify SPL14 modifications and interacting proteins. We made significant progress during the funding period. Briefly, some major accomplishments are highlighted below: (1) To identify potential AtSPL14 target genes, we identified a consensus DNA binding site for the AtSPL14 SBP DNA-binding domain using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential selection (SELEX) and site-directed mutagenesis (Liang et al., 2008). This consensus binding site was used to analyze Affymetrix microarray gene expression data obtained from wild-type and fbr6 mutant plants to find possible AtSPL14-regulated genes. These candidate AtSPL14-regulated genes are providing new information on the molecular mechanisms linking plant PCD and plant development through modulation of the 26S proteasome. (2) Transgenic plants expressing epitope-tagged versions of AtSPL14 are being used to confirm the AtSPL14 targets (by ChIP-PCR) and further dissect the molecular interactions (Nazarenus, Liang and Stone, in preparation) (3) Double mutants generated between fbr6 and various accelerated cell death (acd) mutants indicate that sphingolipid metabolism is influenced by AtSPL14 and sphingolipidomics profiling supports this conclusion (Lin, Markham and Stone, in preparation). (4) A new set of phenotypes have been uncovered in the original fbr6-1 mutant, including a short-root phenotype related to auxin signaling and altered photosynthetic parameters related to stomatal density and conductance (Lin and Stone, in preparation; Lin, Madhavan and Stone, in preparation). Additional AtSPL14-related mutants and transgenic plants have been generated to effectively dissect the functions of AtSPL14, including a dominant negative fbr6-2 allele and transgenic plants overexpressing FBR6/AtSPL14 that display an accelerated cell death (acd) phenotype.

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  • Report No.: DOE/ER/15648-1
  • Grant Number: FG02-05ER15648
  • DOI: 10.2172/937080 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 937080
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc896129

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  • September 13, 2008

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Nov. 4, 2016, 3:47 p.m.

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Stone, Julie M. Role of a Transcriptional Regulator in Programmed Cell Death and Plant Development, report, September 13, 2008; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc896129/: accessed August 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.