Novel Methods for Binding Disparate Materials

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Description

This project was intended to advance the science of surface bonding in order to provide the functionality demanded by target fabrication requirements, as well as similar needs in other fields of importance to LLNL. We have developed and demonstrated a very powerful capability, i.e. 'single molecule force spectroscopy', that allows the strength of individual chemical bonds to be measured. This project focused on long chain molecules that are covalently bound to surfaces on one end and have complementary reactive groups that have the potential for bridging between surfaces. In biological systems, long chain tethers provide the mechanism for adhesion between ... continued below

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7 p. (0.3 MB)

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McElfresh, M W; Rudd, R E; Ratto, T V & Langry, K C February 13, 2006.

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Description

This project was intended to advance the science of surface bonding in order to provide the functionality demanded by target fabrication requirements, as well as similar needs in other fields of importance to LLNL. We have developed and demonstrated a very powerful capability, i.e. 'single molecule force spectroscopy', that allows the strength of individual chemical bonds to be measured. This project focused on long chain molecules that are covalently bound to surfaces on one end and have complementary reactive groups that have the potential for bridging between surfaces. In biological systems, long chain tethers provide the mechanism for adhesion between dissimilar surfaces, e.g. bacteria adhesion to cells, and were found useful for developing the methodology. Polymer tethers offer the means to bridge across finite surface roughness and have the potential of forming thin, well-characterized bonds on a variety of surfaces.

Physical Description

7 p. (0.3 MB)

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PDF-file: 7 pages; size: 0.3 Mbytes

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  • Report No.: UCRL-TR-224096
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • DOI: 10.2172/928197 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 928197
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc895846

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  • February 13, 2006

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • April 17, 2017, 12:59 p.m.

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McElfresh, M W; Rudd, R E; Ratto, T V & Langry, K C. Novel Methods for Binding Disparate Materials, report, February 13, 2006; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc895846/: accessed September 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.