Numerical modeling of injection and mineral trapping of CO2 withH2S and SO2 in a Sandstone Formation

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Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations could decrease the atmospheric accumulation of this gas from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, by co-injecting H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2}, the products respectively of coal gasification or combustion, with captured CO{sub 2}, problems associated with surface disposal would be mitigated. We developed models that simulate the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} into an arkose formation at a depth of about 2 km and 75 C. The hydrogeology and mineralogy of the injected formation are typical of those encountered in Gulf Coast aquifers of the United States. Six ... continued below

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Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten & Yamamoto, Hajime September 7, 2004.

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Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations could decrease the atmospheric accumulation of this gas from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, by co-injecting H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2}, the products respectively of coal gasification or combustion, with captured CO{sub 2}, problems associated with surface disposal would be mitigated. We developed models that simulate the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} into an arkose formation at a depth of about 2 km and 75 C. The hydrogeology and mineralogy of the injected formation are typical of those encountered in Gulf Coast aquifers of the United States. Six numerical simulations of a simplified 1-D radial region surrounding the injection well were performed. The injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S results in a concentrically zoned distribution of secondary minerals surrounding a leached and acidified region adjacent to the injection well. Co-injection of SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} results in a larger and more strongly acidified zone, and alteration differs substantially from that caused by the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Precipitation of carbonates occurs within a higher pH (pH > 5) peripheral zone. Significant quantities of CO{sub 2} are sequestered by ankerite, dawsonite, and lesser siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capacity of the formation can attain 40-50 kg/m{sup 3} medium for the selected arkose. In contrast, secondary sulfates precipitate at lower pH (pH < 5) within the acidified zone. Most of the injected SO{sub 2} is transformed and immobilized through alunite precipitation with lesser amounts of anhydrite and minor quantities of pyrite. The dissolved CO{sub 2} increases with time (enhanced solubility trapping). The mineral alteration induced by injection of CO{sub 2} with either SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S leads to corresponding changes in porosity. Significant increases in porosity occur in the acidified zones where mineral dissolution dominates. With co-injection of SO{sub 2}, the porosity increases from an initial 0.3 to 0.43 after 100 years. However, within the CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping zone, the porosity decreases to about 0.28 for both cases, because of the addition of CO{sub 2} mass as secondary carbonates to the rock matrix. Precipitation of sulfates at the acidification front causes porosity to decrease to 0.23. The limited information currently available on the mineralogy of naturally occurring high-pressure CO{sub 2} reservoirs is generally consistent with our simulations.

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  • Journal Name: Chemical Geology; Journal Volume: 242; Journal Issue: 3-4; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 08/15/2007

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  • Report No.: LBNL--57426-JArt
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 929005
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc895656

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  • September 7, 2004

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Oct. 31, 2016, 3:55 p.m.

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Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten & Yamamoto, Hajime. Numerical modeling of injection and mineral trapping of CO2 withH2S and SO2 in a Sandstone Formation, article, September 7, 2004; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc895656/: accessed October 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.