Alloy Design and Development of Cast Cr-W-V Ferritic Steels for Improved High-Temperature Strength for Power Generation Applications

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Economic and environmental concerns demand that the power-generation industry seek increased efficiency for gas turbines. Higher efficiency requires higher operating temperatures, with the objective temperature for the hottest sections of new systems {approx} 593 C, and increasing to {approx} 650 C. Because of their good thermal properties, Cr-Mo-V cast ferritic steels are currently used for components such as rotors, casings, pipes, etc., but new steels are required for the new operating conditions. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed new wrought Cr-W-V steels with 3-9% Cr, 2-3% W, 0.25% V (compositions are in wt.%), and minor amounts of additional ... continued below

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Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Vitek, J.M.; Evans, N.D. & Hashimoto, N. September 23, 2006.

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Economic and environmental concerns demand that the power-generation industry seek increased efficiency for gas turbines. Higher efficiency requires higher operating temperatures, with the objective temperature for the hottest sections of new systems {approx} 593 C, and increasing to {approx} 650 C. Because of their good thermal properties, Cr-Mo-V cast ferritic steels are currently used for components such as rotors, casings, pipes, etc., but new steels are required for the new operating conditions. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed new wrought Cr-W-V steels with 3-9% Cr, 2-3% W, 0.25% V (compositions are in wt.%), and minor amounts of additional elements. These steels have the strength and toughness required for turbine applications. Since cast alloys are expected to behave differently from wrought material, work was pursued to develop new cast steels based on the ORNL wrought compositions. Nine casting test blocks with 3, 9, and 11% Cr were obtained. Eight were Cr-W-V-Ta-type steels based on the ORNL wrought steels; the ninth was COST CB2, a 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb cast steel, which was the most promising cast steel developed in a European alloy-development program. The COST CB2 was used as a control to which the new compositions were compared, and this also provided a comparison between Cr-W-V-Ta and Cr-Mo-V-Nb compositions. Heat treatment studies were carried out on the nine castings to determine normalizing-and-tempering treatments. Microstructures were characterized by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tensile, impact, and creep tests were conducted. Test results on the first nine cast steel compositions indicated that properties of the 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb composition of COST CB2 were better than those of the 3Cr-, 9Cr-, and 11Cr-W-V-Ta steels. Analysis of the results of this first iteration using computational thermodynamics raised the question of the effectiveness in cast steels of the Cr-W-V-Ta combination versus the Cr-Mo-V-Nb combination in COST CB2. To explore this question, nine more casting test blocks, four 3Cr steels and five 11Cr steels were purchased, and microstructure and mechanical properties studies similar to those described above for the first iteration of test blocks were conducted. Experimental results from the second iteration indicated that 11 Cr steels with excellent properties are possible. The 11Cr-1.5Mo-V-Nb steels were superior to 11Cr-2W-V-Ta steels, and it appears the former class of steels can be developed to have tensile and creep properties exceeding those of COST CB2. The W-Nb combination in an 11Cr-2W-V-Nb steel had tensile and short-time creep properties at 650 C better than the 11Cr-1.5Mo-V-Nb steels, although long-time low-stress properties may not be as good because of Laves phase formation. Based on the results, the next step in the development of improved casting steels involves acquisition of 11Cr-1.5Mo-V-Nb-N-B-C and 11Cr-2W-V-Nb-N-B-C steels on which long-term creep-rupture tests (>10,000 h) be conducted. For better oxidation and corrosion resistance, development of 11Cr steels, as opposed to a 9Cr steels, such as COST CB2, are important for future turbine designs that envision operating temperatures of 650 C.

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  • Report No.: ORNL02-0648
  • Grant Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725
  • DOI: 10.2172/939889 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 939889
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc895615

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  • September 23, 2006

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Nov. 22, 2016, 4:26 p.m.

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Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Vitek, J.M.; Evans, N.D. & Hashimoto, N. Alloy Design and Development of Cast Cr-W-V Ferritic Steels for Improved High-Temperature Strength for Power Generation Applications, report, September 23, 2006; Oak Ridge, Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc895615/: accessed June 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.