Physical test of a particle simulation model in a sheared granular system

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We report a detailed comparison of a slow gravity driven sheared granular flow with a computational model performed with the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS). To our knowledge, this is the first thorough test of the LAMMPS model with a laboratory granular flow. In the experiments, grains flow inside a silo with a rectangular cross-section, and are sheared by a rough boundary on one side and smooth boundaries on the other sides. Individual grain position and motion are measured using a particle index matching imaging technique where a fluorescent dye is added to the interstitial liquid which has the ... continued below

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Rycroft, Chris; Orpe, Ashish & Kudrolli, Arshad January 15, 2009.

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We report a detailed comparison of a slow gravity driven sheared granular flow with a computational model performed with the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS). To our knowledge, this is the first thorough test of the LAMMPS model with a laboratory granular flow. In the experiments, grains flow inside a silo with a rectangular cross-section, and are sheared by a rough boundary on one side and smooth boundaries on the other sides. Individual grain position and motion are measured using a particle index matching imaging technique where a fluorescent dye is added to the interstitial liquid which has the same refractive index as the glass beads. The boundary imposes a packing order, and the grains are observed to flow in layers which get progressively more disordered with distance from the walls. The computations use a Cundall--Strack contact model between the grains, using contact parameters that have been used in many other previous studies, and ignore the hydrodynamic effects of the interstitial liquid. Computations are performed to understand the effect of particle coefficient of friction, elasticity, contact model, and polydispersity on mean flow properties. After appropriate scaling, we find that the mean velocity of the grains and the number density as a function of flow cross-section observed in the experiments and the simulations are in excellent agreement. The mean flow profile is observed to be unchanged over a broad range of coefficient of friction, except near the smooth wall. We show that the flow profile is not sensitive to atleast 10\percent polydispersity in particle size. Because the grain elasticity used is smaller in the computations as compared with glass grains, wave-like features can be noted over short time scales in the mean velocity and the velocity auto-correlations measured in the simulations. These wave features occur over an intermediate timescale larger than the particle interaction but smaller than the timescale of the macroscopic flow features. The wave features become more prominent as grain elasticity is further reduced. We then perform a detailed comparison of the particle fluctuation properties as measured by the displacement probability distribution function and the mean square displacement. Excellent agreement is observed over a time interval over which particles can be tracked effectively in the experiments. Using the longer tracking intervals possible in the simulations, we find that the diffusion inthe layers is greater in the flow direction, than in the perpendicular direction. Further signatures of confinement and hopping between layers is observed. All in all, our study provides strong support for the LAMMPS model of granular flow, and further supports the hypothesis that the interstitial liquid has negligible effects on granular fluctuations provided the flow is slow.

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17

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  • Journal Name: Physical Review E

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  • Report No.: LBNL-1430E
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 946739
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc895560

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  • January 15, 2009

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Nov. 8, 2016, 1:20 p.m.

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Rycroft, Chris; Orpe, Ashish & Kudrolli, Arshad. Physical test of a particle simulation model in a sheared granular system, article, January 15, 2009; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc895560/: accessed September 25, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.