Analysis of Protein-RNA and Protein-Peptide Interactions in Equine Infectious Anemia

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Macromolecular interactions are essential for virtually all cellular functions including signal transduction processes, metabolic processes, regulation of gene expression and immune responses. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two important macromolecular interactions involved in the relationship between Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) and its host cell in horse: (1) the interaction between the EIAV Rev protein and its binding site, the Rev-responsive element (RRE) and (2) interactions between equine MHC class I molecules and epitope peptides derived from EIAV proteins. EIAV, one of the most divergent members of the lentivirus family, has a single-stranded RNA genome and carries several ... continued below

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Lee, Jae-Hyung December 1, 2007.

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Macromolecular interactions are essential for virtually all cellular functions including signal transduction processes, metabolic processes, regulation of gene expression and immune responses. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two important macromolecular interactions involved in the relationship between Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) and its host cell in horse: (1) the interaction between the EIAV Rev protein and its binding site, the Rev-responsive element (RRE) and (2) interactions between equine MHC class I molecules and epitope peptides derived from EIAV proteins. EIAV, one of the most divergent members of the lentivirus family, has a single-stranded RNA genome and carries several regulatory and structural proteins within its viral particle. Rev is an essential EIAV regulatory encoded protein that interacts with the viral RRE, a specific binding site in the viral mRNA. Using a combination of experimental and computational methods, the interactions between EIAV Rev and RRE were characterized in detail. EIAV Rev was shown to have a bipartite RNA binding domain contain two arginine rich motifs (ARMs). The RRE secondary structure was determined and specific structural motifs that act as cis-regulatory elements for EIAV Rev-RRE interaction were identified. Interestingly, a structural motif located in the high affinity Rev binding site is well conserved in several diverse lentiviral genoes, including HIV-1. Macromolecular interactions involved in the immune response of the horse to EIAV infection were investigated by analyzing complexes between MHC class I proteins and epitope peptides derived from EIAV Rev, Env and Gag proteins. Computational modeling results provided a mechanistic explanation for the experimental finding that a single amino acid change in the peptide binding domain of the quine MHC class I molecule differentially affectes the recognitino of specific epitopes by EIAV-specific CTL. Together, the findings in this dissertation provide novel insights into the strategy used by EIAV to replicate itself, and provide new details about how the host cell responds to and defends against EIAV upon the infection. Moreover, they have contributed to the understanding of the macromolecular recognition events that regulate these processes.

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  • Report No.: IS-T 2478
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-07CH11358
  • DOI: 10.2172/933138 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 933138
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc895420

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  • December 1, 2007

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Nov. 4, 2016, 6:58 p.m.

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Lee, Jae-Hyung. Analysis of Protein-RNA and Protein-Peptide Interactions in Equine Infectious Anemia, thesis or dissertation, December 1, 2007; Ames, Iowa. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc895420/: accessed October 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.