Localized or Systemic {italic In Vivo} Heat-Inactivation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A Mathematical Analysis

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Temperatures as low as 42 C, maintained for a little as 25 minutes, inactivate {approx}25% of HIV. Furthermore, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T-cells are more sensitive to heat than healthy lymphocytes and susceptibility increases when the cells are pre-sensitized by exposure to tumor necrosis factor. Thus, induction of a whole-body hyperthermia, or hyperthermia specifically limited to tissues having a high viral load, are potential antiviral therapies for acquired immunodeficiency disease (AIDS). Accordingly, we incorporated therapeutic hyperthermia into an existing mathematical model which evaluates the interaction between HIV and CD4{sup +} T cells. Given the assumptions and limitations of this model, ... continued below

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Pennypacker, Carl R.; Perelson, A.S.; Nys, N.; Nelson, G. & Sessler, D.I. December 15, 1993.

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Temperatures as low as 42 C, maintained for a little as 25 minutes, inactivate {approx}25% of HIV. Furthermore, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T-cells are more sensitive to heat than healthy lymphocytes and susceptibility increases when the cells are pre-sensitized by exposure to tumor necrosis factor. Thus, induction of a whole-body hyperthermia, or hyperthermia specifically limited to tissues having a high viral load, are potential antiviral therapies for acquired immunodeficiency disease (AIDS). Accordingly, we incorporated therapeutic hyperthermia into an existing mathematical model which evaluates the interaction between HIV and CD4{sup +} T cells. Given the assumptions and limitations of this model, the results indicate that a daily therapy, reducing the population of actively infected cells by 40% or infectious virus by 50%, would effectively reverse the depletion of T cells. In contrast, a daily reduction of 20% of either actively infected cells or infectious virus would have a marginal effect. However, reduction by 20% of both actively infected cells and infectious virus could restore T cell numbers, assuming that permanent damage had not been inflicted on the thymus. Whole-body hyperthermia seems unlikely to be clinically useful, unless it can be induced non-invasively without general anesthesia. In contrast, heating directed specifically to areas of viral concentration may be effective and have a suitable risk/benefit ratio.

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  • Journal Name: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology; Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 1995

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  • Report No.: LBL-34952
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 937428
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc895257

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • December 15, 1993

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Sept. 30, 2016, 6:47 p.m.

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Pennypacker, Carl R.; Perelson, A.S.; Nys, N.; Nelson, G. & Sessler, D.I. Localized or Systemic {italic In Vivo} Heat-Inactivation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A Mathematical Analysis, article, December 15, 1993; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc895257/: accessed November 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.