Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques

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The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review ... continued below

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114 pages

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Bloom, Elliott D. February 1, 2008.

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The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review of more theoretical ideas. First, elements of general relativity are reviewed, concentrating on those aspects that are needed to understand compact stellar objects (white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes). I then review the equations of state of these objects, concentrating on the simplest standard models from astrophysics. After these mathematical preliminaries, Sec. 2(c) discusses 'The End State of Stars'. Most of this section also uses the simplest standard models. However, as these lectures are for particle physicists, I also discuss some of the more recent approaches to the equation of state of very dense compact objects. These particle-physics-motivated equations of state can dramatically change how we view the formation of black holes. Section 3 focuses on the properties of the objects that we want to characterize and measure. X-ray binary systems and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are stressed because the lectures center on understanding very dense stellar objects, black hole candidates (BHCs), and their accompanying high gravitational fields. The use of x-ray timing and gamma-ray experiments is also introduced in this section. Sections 4 and 5 review information from x-ray and gamma-ray experiments. These sections also discuss the current state of the art in x-ray and gamma-ray satellite experiments and plans for future experiments.

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114 pages

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  • Journal Name: In *Stanford 1994, Particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology* 133-198.; Conference: Invited talk at 22nd Annual SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics: Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology (School: Aug 8-16, 1994 followed by Topical Conference: Aug 17-19, 1994) (SSI 94), Stanford, California, 8-19 Aug 1994

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  • Report No.: SLAC-PUB-13110
  • Grant Number: AC02-76SF00515
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 929285
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc893832

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  • February 1, 2008

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Sept. 26, 2017, 2:57 p.m.

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Bloom, Elliott D. Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques, article, February 1, 2008; [Menlo Park, California]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc893832/: accessed October 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.