CHEMICAL TRAPPING OF A PRIMARY QUANTUM CONVERSION PRODUCT INPHOTOSYNTHESIS

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The capacity of photosynthetic organisms to exhibit photo-induced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals has been known for over ten years. Subcellular units of photosynthetic materials, the quantasomes and the chromatophores, are capable of Hill Reaction activity, and also of exhibiting the light-induced EPR signals. This, coupled with the rapid rise and decay kinetics of these signals, suggests but does not prove that the unpaired electrons are involved in the initial electron transfer processes in the primary quantum conversion act. The identification of the species giving rise to these signals and their connection with processes of primary quantum conversion remains elusive ... continued below

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Corker, Gerald A.; Klein, Melvin P. & Calvin, Melvin. September 9, 1966.

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The capacity of photosynthetic organisms to exhibit photo-induced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals has been known for over ten years. Subcellular units of photosynthetic materials, the quantasomes and the chromatophores, are capable of Hill Reaction activity, and also of exhibiting the light-induced EPR signals. This, coupled with the rapid rise and decay kinetics of these signals, suggests but does not prove that the unpaired electrons are involved in the initial electron transfer processes in the primary quantum conversion act. The identification of the species giving rise to these signals and their connection with processes of primary quantum conversion remains elusive even though such varied approaches as mutant strains, special growth conditions, extreme physical conditions, special metabolic inhibitors, etc. have been applied to this problem. In this communication the authors wish to report another method being used in an attempt to identify the species responsible for the unpaired electrons. Hoffman prepared a water soluble, stable free radical, di-tertiary-butylnitroxide (hereafter called DTBN), which is a 'vigorous free radical scavenger'. It shows a sharp, well resolved, symmetrical, three-line paramagnetic resonance spectrum that is relatively insensitive to the molecular environment. The chemistry of di-tertiary butylnitroxide has not been studied extensively. However, four distinct types of interaction can be envisioned for this molecule. It could undergo a one-electron reduction to form a hydroxylamine which can be reduced subsequently to the amine; an oxidative degradation to 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane and isobutylene; or a coupling with another radical forming either an oxygen substituted hydroxylamine or a tri-substituted amine oxide.

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12 p.

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  • Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Science; Journal Volume: 56; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 11/1966

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  • Report No.: UCRL--17134
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.56.5.1365 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 932537
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc893752

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • September 9, 1966

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Nov. 3, 2016, 7:49 p.m.

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Corker, Gerald A.; Klein, Melvin P. & Calvin, Melvin. CHEMICAL TRAPPING OF A PRIMARY QUANTUM CONVERSION PRODUCT INPHOTOSYNTHESIS, article, September 9, 1966; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc893752/: accessed December 16, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.