GLAST and Suzaku: Study on Cosmic-Ray Acceleration And Interaction in the Cosmos

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The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multiagency mission scheduled for launch in the fall 2007. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary instrument of the mission, will survey the high energy sky found to be very dynamic and surprisingly diverse by its predecessor the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). GLAST-LAT will have a much improved sensitivity when compared with EGRET and extend the higher energy coverage to {approx} 300 GeV. The instrument is now mounted on the spacecraft and undergoing a suite of pre-flight tests. Data analysis software has been tried out by collaborators ... continued below

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5 pages

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Kamae, T. & /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC May 23, 2008.

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Description

The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multiagency mission scheduled for launch in the fall 2007. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary instrument of the mission, will survey the high energy sky found to be very dynamic and surprisingly diverse by its predecessor the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). GLAST-LAT will have a much improved sensitivity when compared with EGRET and extend the higher energy coverage to {approx} 300 GeV. The instrument is now mounted on the spacecraft and undergoing a suite of pre-flight tests. Data analysis software has been tried out by collaborators in two rounds of 'Data Challenges' using simulated observations including backgrounds. The instrument performance and observational data on selected sources presented here have been obtained through the Data Challenges in the collaborative efforts. There are features in the GLAST-LAT observation possibly unfamiliar to X-ray astronomers: (1) GLAST will operate mostly in the survey mode; (2) the foreground objects (gas, dust, and star-light) become gamma-ray sources; (3) multiple sources will be 'confused' because of the wide point-spread-function. The last two features will pose a challenge for analysis on extended Galactic sources such as supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae: multi-wavelength study with X-ray instruments like Suzaku and atmospheric Chrenkov telescopes will become essential to dig out the underlying physics.

Physical Description

5 pages

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  • Journal Name: Prog.Theor.Phys.Suppl.169:307-311,2007; Conference: Prepared for 6th Suzaku Conference: The Extreme Universe in the Suzaku Era, Kyoto, Japan, 4-8 Dec 2006

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  • Report No.: SLAC-PUB-13216
  • Grant Number: AC02-76SF00515
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 928737
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc893641

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • May 23, 2008

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Dec. 5, 2016, 6:25 p.m.

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Kamae, T. & /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC. GLAST and Suzaku: Study on Cosmic-Ray Acceleration And Interaction in the Cosmos, article, May 23, 2008; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc893641/: accessed December 15, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.