Simulations of Fracture and Fragmentation of Geologic Materials using Combined FEM/DEM/SPH Analysis

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An overview of the Lawrence Discrete Element Code (LDEC) is presented, and results from a study investigating the effect of explosive and impact loading on geologic materials using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC) are detailed. LDEC was initially developed to simulate tunnels and other structures in jointed rock masses using large numbers of polyhedral blocks. Many geophysical applications, such as projectile penetration into rock, concrete targets, and boulder fields, require a combination of continuum and discrete methods in order to predict the formation and interaction of the fragments produced. In an effort to model this class of problems, LDEC ... continued below

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9 p. (0.2 MB)

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Morris, J P & Johnson, S M April 5, 2007.

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Description

An overview of the Lawrence Discrete Element Code (LDEC) is presented, and results from a study investigating the effect of explosive and impact loading on geologic materials using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC) are detailed. LDEC was initially developed to simulate tunnels and other structures in jointed rock masses using large numbers of polyhedral blocks. Many geophysical applications, such as projectile penetration into rock, concrete targets, and boulder fields, require a combination of continuum and discrete methods in order to predict the formation and interaction of the fragments produced. In an effort to model this class of problems, LDEC now includes implementations of Cosserat point theory and cohesive elements. This approach directly simulates the transition from continuum to discontinuum behavior, thereby allowing for dynamic fracture within a combined finite element/discrete element framework. In addition, a Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) capability has been incorporated into LDEC, permitting the simulation of fluid-structure interaction. We will present results from a study of detonation-induced fracture and fragmentation of geologic media surrounding a tunnel using LDEC.

Physical Description

9 p. (0.2 MB)

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PDF-file: 9 pages; size: 0.2 Mbytes

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  • Presented at: 4th International Conference on Discrete Element Methods, Brisbane, Australia, Aug 27 - Aug 29, 2007

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  • Report No.: UCRL-CONF-229812
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 920474
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc893417

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • April 5, 2007

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • April 17, 2017, 2:11 p.m.

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Morris, J P & Johnson, S M. Simulations of Fracture and Fragmentation of Geologic Materials using Combined FEM/DEM/SPH Analysis, article, April 5, 2007; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc893417/: accessed October 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.