MONITORING WASTE HEAT REJECTION TO THE ENVIRONMENT VIA REMOTE SENSING

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Nuclear power plants typically use waste heat rejection systems such as cooling lakes and natural draft cooling towers. These systems are designed to reduce cooling water temperatures sufficiently to allow full power operation even during adverse meteorological conditions. After the power plant is operational, the performance of the cooling system is assessed. These assessments usually rely on measured temperatures of the cooling water after it has lost heat to the environment and is being pumped back into the power plant (cooling water inlet temperature). If the cooling system performance is not perceived to be optimal, the utility will collect additional ... continued below

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Garrett, A January 13, 2009.

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Nuclear power plants typically use waste heat rejection systems such as cooling lakes and natural draft cooling towers. These systems are designed to reduce cooling water temperatures sufficiently to allow full power operation even during adverse meteorological conditions. After the power plant is operational, the performance of the cooling system is assessed. These assessments usually rely on measured temperatures of the cooling water after it has lost heat to the environment and is being pumped back into the power plant (cooling water inlet temperature). If the cooling system performance is not perceived to be optimal, the utility will collect additional data to determine why. This paper discusses the use of thermal imagery collected from aircraft and satellites combined with numerical simulation to better understand the dynamics and thermodynamics of nuclear power plant waste heat dissipation systems. The ANS meeting presentation will discuss analyses of several power plant cooling systems based on a combination of remote sensing data and hydrodynamic modeling.

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  • ANS 2009 Annual Meeting

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  • Report No.: SRNL-STI-2009-00031
  • Grant Number: DE-AC09-08SR22470
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 948118
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc893011

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  • January 13, 2009

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  • Sept. 27, 2016, 1:39 a.m.

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  • Nov. 2, 2016, 5:23 p.m.

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Garrett, A. MONITORING WASTE HEAT REJECTION TO THE ENVIRONMENT VIA REMOTE SENSING, article, January 13, 2009; [Aiken, South Carolina]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc893011/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.