Cell-directed assembly on an integrated nanoelectronic/nanophotonic device for probing cellular responses on the nanoscale.

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Our discovery that the introduction of living cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alters dramatically the evaporation driven self-assembly of lipid-silica nanostructures suggested the formation of novel bio/nano interfaces useful for cellular interrogation at the nanoscale. This one year ''out of the box'' LDRD focused on the localization of metallic and semi-conducting nanocrystals at the fluid, lipid-rich interface between S. cerevisiae and the surrounding phospholipid-templated silica nanostructure with the primary goal of creating Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)-active nanostructures and platforms for cellular integration into electrode arrays. Such structures are of interest for probing cellular responses to the onset of disease, understanding of ... continued below

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22 p.

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Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Ashley, Carlee E. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fan, Hongyou; Lopez, DeAnna (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Simpson, Regina Lynn et al. January 1, 2006.

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Description

Our discovery that the introduction of living cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alters dramatically the evaporation driven self-assembly of lipid-silica nanostructures suggested the formation of novel bio/nano interfaces useful for cellular interrogation at the nanoscale. This one year ''out of the box'' LDRD focused on the localization of metallic and semi-conducting nanocrystals at the fluid, lipid-rich interface between S. cerevisiae and the surrounding phospholipid-templated silica nanostructure with the primary goal of creating Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)-active nanostructures and platforms for cellular integration into electrode arrays. Such structures are of interest for probing cellular responses to the onset of disease, understanding of cell-cell communication, and the development of cell-based bio-sensors. As SERS is known to be sensitive to the size and shape of metallic (principally gold and silver) nanocrystals, various sizes and shapes of nanocrystals were synthesized, functionalized and localized at the cellular surface by our ''cell-directed assembly'' approach. Laser scanning confocal microscopy, SEM, and in situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) experiments were performed to study metallic nanocrystal localization. Preliminary Raman spectroscopy studies were conducted to test for SERS activity. Interferometric lithography was used to construct high aspect ratio cylindrical holes on patterned gold substrates and electro-deposition experiments were performed in a preliminary attempt to create electrode arrays. A new printing procedure was also developed for cellular integration into nanostructured platforms that avoids solvent exposure and may mitigate osmotic stress. Using a different approach, substrates comprised of self-assembled nanoparticles in a phospholipid templated silica film were also developed. When printed on top of these substrates, the cells integrate themselves into the mesoporous silica film and direct organization of the nanoparticles to the cell surface for integration into the cell.

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22 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2005-7951
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/883480 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 883480
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc892809

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • January 1, 2006

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 23, 2016, 2:42 p.m.

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  • Dec. 9, 2016, 3:33 p.m.

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Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Ashley, Carlee E. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fan, Hongyou; Lopez, DeAnna (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Simpson, Regina Lynn et al. Cell-directed assembly on an integrated nanoelectronic/nanophotonic device for probing cellular responses on the nanoscale., report, January 1, 2006; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc892809/: accessed October 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.