Geochemical considerations for Hot, Dry Rock Systems

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Circulating systems intended to model the P-T conditions found in the natural HDR (Hot Dry Rock) geothermal system at Los Alamos have been built. Experiments with these systems have determined the following parameters for the ''down hole'' reservoir: sample weight loss, circulating solution composition, textural changes in the rock, mineral loss from the rock and effects of chemical additives on rock erosion. The analyses of solutions generated from rock-water interactions in the experimental systems show the extremely dilute nature of the working fluid. These solutions are not brines. Silica scaling in the surface heat exchanger was found to account for ... continued below

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Balagna, J.; Blatz, L.; Charles, R.; Feber, R.; Herrick, C.; Holley, C. et al. January 1, 1976.

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Circulating systems intended to model the P-T conditions found in the natural HDR (Hot Dry Rock) geothermal system at Los Alamos have been built. Experiments with these systems have determined the following parameters for the ''down hole'' reservoir: sample weight loss, circulating solution composition, textural changes in the rock, mineral loss from the rock and effects of chemical additives on rock erosion. The analyses of solutions generated from rock-water interactions in the experimental systems show the extremely dilute nature of the working fluid. These solutions are not brines. Silica scaling in the surface heat exchanger was found to account for the difference between loss of sample rate and analyzed silica in the solution. The weight loss data indicate that there was continuous transport of silica from the ''down hole'' rock to the heat exchanger. Experiments contrasting felsic and mafic rocks in the HDR concept indicate that a reservoir consisting of glass bearing basaltic rock would tend to produce greater scaling problems than systems emplaced in granite. Experimental results suggest that Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions may provide a means of increasing permeability and thereby increasing the effective heat transfer area of the reservoir. A brief description is given of a small test loop for simulating the flow of a geothermal solution through a heat exchanger. This loop, which is being built, will be used to study the coagulation and precipitation of silica under conditions similar to those expected in the field.

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  • Conference on scale management in geothermal energy development, San Diego, CA, August 2-4, 1976

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  • Report No.: COO-2607-4
  • Report No.: CONF-760844-10
  • Grant Number: E(11-1)-2607
  • Grant Number: NSF-G-AER-74-17445
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 886864
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc891917

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • January 1, 1976

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  • Sept. 23, 2016, 2:42 p.m.

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  • Dec. 7, 2016, 3 p.m.

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Balagna, J.; Blatz, L.; Charles, R.; Feber, R.; Herrick, C.; Holley, C. et al. Geochemical considerations for Hot, Dry Rock Systems, article, January 1, 1976; Los Alamos, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc891917/: accessed October 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.