Early Gas Stripping as the Origin of the Darkest Galaxies in the Universe

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The known galaxies most dominated by dark matter (Draco, Ursa Minor and Andromeda IX) are satellites of the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies. They are members of a class of faint galaxies, devoid of gas, known as dwarf spheroidals, and have by far the highest ratio of dark to luminous matter. None of the models proposed to unravel their origin can simultaneously explain their exceptional dark matter content and their proximity to a much larger galaxy. Here we report simulations showing that the progenitors of these galaxies were probably gas-dominated dwarf galaxies that became satellites of a larger galaxy ... continued below

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28 pages

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Mayer, Lucio; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mastropietro, Chiara & Wadsley, James February 28, 2007.

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The known galaxies most dominated by dark matter (Draco, Ursa Minor and Andromeda IX) are satellites of the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies. They are members of a class of faint galaxies, devoid of gas, known as dwarf spheroidals, and have by far the highest ratio of dark to luminous matter. None of the models proposed to unravel their origin can simultaneously explain their exceptional dark matter content and their proximity to a much larger galaxy. Here we report simulations showing that the progenitors of these galaxies were probably gas-dominated dwarf galaxies that became satellites of a larger galaxy earlier than the other dwarf spheroidals. We find that a combination of tidal shocks and ram pressure swept away the entire gas content of such progenitors about ten billion years ago because heating by the cosmic ultraviolet background kept the gas loosely bound: a tiny stellar component embedded in a relatively massive dark halo survived until today. All luminous galaxies should be surrounded by a few extremely dark-matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal satellites, and these should have the shortest orbital periods among dwarf spheroidals because they were accreted early.

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28 pages

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  • Journal Name: Nature 445:738-740,2007; Journal Volume: 445

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  • Report No.: SLAC-PUB-12362
  • Grant Number: AC02-76SF00515
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 900234
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc891245

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • February 28, 2007

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • July 25, 2017, 3:51 p.m.

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Mayer, Lucio; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mastropietro, Chiara & Wadsley, James. Early Gas Stripping as the Origin of the Darkest Galaxies in the Universe, article, February 28, 2007; [Menlo Park, California]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc891245/: accessed April 25, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.