DOE Ocean Carbon Sequestration Research Workshop 2005 - May 26th thru 27th

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The purpose of this workshop was to bring together the principal investigators of all the projects that were being funded under the DOE ocean carbon sequestration research program. The primary goal of the workshop was to interchange research results, to discuss ongoing research, and to identify future research priorities. In addition, we hoped to encourage the development of synergies and collaborations between the projects and to write an EOS article summarizing the results of the meeting. The primary outcome of the meeting was a decision to write two papers for the reviewed literature on carbon sequestration by iron fertilization, and ... continued below

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Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Chavez, Francisco; Maltrud, Matthew; Adams, Eric; Arrigo, Kevin; Barry, James et al. January 11, 2007.

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The purpose of this workshop was to bring together the principal investigators of all the projects that were being funded under the DOE ocean carbon sequestration research program. The primary goal of the workshop was to interchange research results, to discuss ongoing research, and to identify future research priorities. In addition, we hoped to encourage the development of synergies and collaborations between the projects and to write an EOS article summarizing the results of the meeting. The primary outcome of the meeting was a decision to write two papers for the reviewed literature on carbon sequestration by iron fertilization, and on carbon sequestration by deep sea injection and to examine the possibility of an overview article in EOS on the topic of ocean carbon sequestration. There has been significant progress on several of these goals since the meeting: (1) Review of carbon sequestration by iron fertilization: One of the most interesting results of the meeting was a presentation by John Marshall of iron fertilization simulations carried out at MIT that suggested a much higher efficiency of CO2 uptake from the atmosphere with a newer generation model (since published by Dutkiewicz, et al., 2006]) than earlier studies had found with an older generation model (cf., Gnanadesikan, et al., 2003). The decision was made that this finding should be investigated with a new set of simulations using other newer generation models with realistic parameterization of biological processes. This research has progressed considerably, with the modeling groups of MIT, Princeton University, UCLA, Stanford University, and Los Alamos National Laboratory participating. A follow up meeting of the principal participants was held on September 11-15, 2006, using remaining funds from the original grant, and three manuscripts are now in an advanced state of preparation: Chavez, F., et al., in preparation. A review of iron fertilization Jin, X., N. Gruber, and H. Frenzel, in preparation. Factors impacting the atmospheric uptake efficiency of iron fertilization. Sarmiento, J. L., R. D. Slater, M. E. Maltrud, and J. Dunne, in preparation. Iron fertilization models revisited. The new iron fertilization simulation confirms some of the MIT results of higher efficiency, while also drawing attention to several additional processes not considered in previous studies such as the effect of eddies in an eddy resolving model (Jin et al., in preparation), and the effect of including a realistic atmospheric reservoir in the models as in Gnanadesikan, et al. [2003], which leads to a significant reduction in the overall efficiency (cf., Sarmiento et al., in preparation). (2) Review of carbon sequestration by deep sea injection: An outline of paper was completed by J. Barry, but this project has not progressed beyond this point. (3) Overview article for EOS on ocean carbon sequestration. This idea was put on hold until the issues raised by the MIT study of iron fertilization had been resolved. After the three papers on this topic are completed, we will decide if an overview article is still merited. References Dutkiewicz, S., et al. (2006), Controls on ocean productivity and air-sea carbon flux: An adjoint model sensitivity study, Geophysical Research Letters, 33, L02603, doi:10.1029/2005GL024987. Gnanadesikan, A., et al. (2003), Effects of patchy ocean fertilization on atmospheric carbon dioxide and biological production, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 17, doi: 10.1029/2002GB001940.

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  • DOE Ocean Carbon Sequestration Research Workshop 2005 - Belmont Manor House and Conference Center; May 26-27, 2005 DOE Ocean Carbon Sequestration Research Workshop Follow-up Meeting - MBARI and UCLA; September 11-15, 2006

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  • Report No.: DOE-ER64040
  • Grant Number: FG02-05ER64040
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 898537
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc891243

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  • January 11, 2007

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 4, 2016, 6:26 p.m.

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Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Chavez, Francisco; Maltrud, Matthew; Adams, Eric; Arrigo, Kevin; Barry, James et al. DOE Ocean Carbon Sequestration Research Workshop 2005 - May 26th thru 27th, article, January 11, 2007; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc891243/: accessed December 11, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.