Nanostructured polyoxometalate arrays with unprecedented properties and functions.

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Polyoxometalates (POMs) are ionic (usually anionic) metal -oxo clusters that are both functional entities for a variety of applications, as well as structural units that can be used as building blocks if reacted under appropriate conditions. This is a powerful combination in that functionality can be built into materials, or doped into matrices. Additionally, by assembling functional POMs in ordered materials, new collective behaviors may be realized. Further, the vast variety of POM geometries, compositions and charges that are achievable gives this system a high degree of tunability. Processing conditions to link together POMs to build materials offer another vector ... continued below

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27 p.

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Dunphy, Darren Robert; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Singh, Seema & Nyman, May Devan November 1, 2003.

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Description

Polyoxometalates (POMs) are ionic (usually anionic) metal -oxo clusters that are both functional entities for a variety of applications, as well as structural units that can be used as building blocks if reacted under appropriate conditions. This is a powerful combination in that functionality can be built into materials, or doped into matrices. Additionally, by assembling functional POMs in ordered materials, new collective behaviors may be realized. Further, the vast variety of POM geometries, compositions and charges that are achievable gives this system a high degree of tunability. Processing conditions to link together POMs to build materials offer another vector of control, thus providing infinite possibilities of materials that can he nano-engineered through POM building blocks. POM applications that can be built into POM-based materials include catalysis, electro-optic and electro-chromic, anti-viral, metal binding, and protein binding. We have begun to explore three approaches in developing this field of functional, nano-engineered POM-based materials; and this report summarizes the work carried out for these approaches to date. The three strategies are: (1) doping POMs into silica matrices using sol-gel science, (2) forming POM-surfactant arrays and metal-POM-surfactant arrays, (3) using aerosol-spray pyrolysis of the POM-surfactant arrays to superimpose hierarchical architecture by self-assembly during aerosol-processing. Doping POMs into silica matrices was successful, but the POMs were partially degraded upon attempts to remove the structure-directing templates. The POM-surfactant and metal-POM-surfactant arrays approach was highly successful and holds much promise as a novel approach to nano-engineering new materials from structural and functional POM building blocks, as well as forming metastable or unusual POM geometries that may not be obtained by other synthetic methods. The aerosol-assisted self assembly approach is in very preliminary state of investigation, but also shows promise in that structured materials were formed; where the structure was altered by aerosol processing. We will be seeking alternative funding to continue investigating the second synthetic strategy that we have begun to develop during this 1-year project.

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27 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2003-3818
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/918363 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 918363
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc890340

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • November 1, 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 29, 2016, 9:27 p.m.

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Dunphy, Darren Robert; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Singh, Seema & Nyman, May Devan. Nanostructured polyoxometalate arrays with unprecedented properties and functions., report, November 1, 2003; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc890340/: accessed December 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.