Site Characterization for CO2 Geologic Storage and Vice Versa -The Frio Brine Pilot as a Case Study

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Careful site characterization is critical for successfulgeologic sequestration of CO2, especially for sequestration inbrine-bearing formations that have not been previously used for otherpurposes. Traditional site characterization techniques such asgeophysical imaging, well logging, core analyses, interference welltesting, and tracer testing are all valuable. However, the injection andmonitoring of CO2 itself provides a wealth of additional information.Rather than considering a rigid chronology in which CO2 sequestrationoccurs only after site characterization is complete, we recommend thatCO2 injection and monitoring be an integral part of thesite-characterization process. The advantages of this approach arenumerous. The obvious benefit of CO2 injection is to provide informationon multi-phase ... continued below

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Doughty, Christine February 14, 2006.

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Careful site characterization is critical for successfulgeologic sequestration of CO2, especially for sequestration inbrine-bearing formations that have not been previously used for otherpurposes. Traditional site characterization techniques such asgeophysical imaging, well logging, core analyses, interference welltesting, and tracer testing are all valuable. However, the injection andmonitoring of CO2 itself provides a wealth of additional information.Rather than considering a rigid chronology in which CO2 sequestrationoccurs only after site characterization is complete, we recommend thatCO2 injection and monitoring be an integral part of thesite-characterization process. The advantages of this approach arenumerous. The obvious benefit of CO2 injection is to provide informationon multi-phase flow properties, which cannot be obtained from traditionalsitecharacterization techniques that examine single-phase conditions.Additionally, the low density and viscosity of CO2 compared to brinecauses the two components to flow through the subsurface differently,potentially revealing distinct features of the geology. Finally, tounderstand sequestered CO2 behavior in the subsurface, there is nosubstitute for studying the movement of CO2 directly. Making CO2injection part of site characterization has practical benefits as well.The infrastructure for surface handling of CO2 (compression, heating,local storage) can be developed, the CO2 injection process can bedebugged, and monitoring techniques can be field-tested. Prior to actualsequestration, small amounts of CO2 may be trucked in. Later, monitoringaccompanying the actual sequestration operations may be used tocontinually refine and improve understanding of CO2 behavior in thesubsurface.

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  • International Symposium on Site Chracterizationfor CO2 Geological Storage, Berkley, CA, 20-22 March,2006

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  • Report No.: LBNL--59816-Ext.-Abs.
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 900649
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc890090

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • February 14, 2006

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Sept. 30, 2016, 12:44 p.m.

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Doughty, Christine. Site Characterization for CO2 Geologic Storage and Vice Versa -The Frio Brine Pilot as a Case Study, article, February 14, 2006; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc890090/: accessed November 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.