Comparison of NOx Removal Efficiencies in Compost Based Biofilters Using Four Different Compost Sources

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In 1998, 3.6 trillion kilowatt-hours of electricity were generated in the United States. Over half of this was from coal-fired power plants, resulting in more than 8.3 million tons of nitrogen oxide (NOx) compounds being released into the environment. Over 95% of the NOx compounds produced during coal combustion are in the form of nitric oxide (NO). NOx emission regulations are becoming increasingly stringent, leading to the need for new, cost effective NOx treatment technologies. Biofiltration is such a technology. NO removal efficiencies were compared in compost based biofilters using four different composts. In previous experiments, removal efficiencies were typically ... continued below

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Lacey, Jeffrey Alan; Lee, Brady Douglas & Apel, William Arnold June 1, 2001.

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In 1998, 3.6 trillion kilowatt-hours of electricity were generated in the United States. Over half of this was from coal-fired power plants, resulting in more than 8.3 million tons of nitrogen oxide (NOx) compounds being released into the environment. Over 95% of the NOx compounds produced during coal combustion are in the form of nitric oxide (NO). NOx emission regulations are becoming increasingly stringent, leading to the need for new, cost effective NOx treatment technologies. Biofiltration is such a technology. NO removal efficiencies were compared in compost based biofilters using four different composts. In previous experiments, removal efficiencies were typically highest at the beginning of the experiment, and decreased as the experiments proceeded. This work tested different types of compost in an effort to find a compost that could maintain NO removal efficiencies comparable to those seen early in the previous experiments. One of the composts was wood based with manure, two were wood based with high nitrogen content sludge, and one was dairy compost. The wood based with manure and one of the wood based with sludge composts were taken directly from an active compost pile while the other two composts were received in retail packaging which had been out of active piles for an indeterminate amount of time. A high temperature (55-60°C) off-gas stream was treated in biofilters operated under denitrifying conditions. Biofilters were operated at an empty bed residence time of 13 seconds with target inlet NO concentrations of 500 ppmv. Lactate was the carbon and energy source. Compost was sampled at 10-day intervals to determine aerobic and anaerobic microbial densities. Compost was mixed at a 1:1 ratio with lava rock and calcite was added at 100g/kg of compost. In each compost tested, the highest removal efficiencies occurred within the first 10 days of the experiment. The wood based with manure peaked at day 3 (77.14%), the dairy compost at day 1 (80.74%), the active wood based with sludge at day 5 (68.15%) and the inactive wood based with sludge at day 9 (63.64%, this compost was frozen when received). These levels gradually decreased throughout the remainder of the experiment until they fell between 40% and 60%. Decreasing removal efficiency was characteristic of all the composts tested, regardless of their makeup or activity state prior to testing. Although microbial densities and composition between composts may have differed, there was little change in densities within each experiment.

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  • 94th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the Air and Waste Management Association,Orlando, FL,06/24/2001,06/28/2001

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  • Report No.: INEEL/CON-00-01240
  • Grant Number: DE-AC07-99ID-13727
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 910898
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc889864

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  • June 1, 2001

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Dec. 6, 2016, 7:50 p.m.

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Lacey, Jeffrey Alan; Lee, Brady Douglas & Apel, William Arnold. Comparison of NOx Removal Efficiencies in Compost Based Biofilters Using Four Different Compost Sources, article, June 1, 2001; [Idaho Falls, Idaho]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc889864/: accessed September 25, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.