A study of steel alloys for potential use in CO2 sequestration

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The effect of CO2 as a greenhouse gas, and the potential of global warming, has led to the study of sequestration of CO2 as a mineral carbonate. Some of the processes of mineral sequestration involve handing large tonnages of silicate minerals and reacting them with CO2. In this study the Albany Research Center evaluated the effects of wear and corrosion individually, and any possible synergetic effects resulting from a combination of wear and corrosion, on steel alloys that might be used in CO2 sequestration. By understanding the mechanism of slurry material loss, a better selection of erosion/corrosion resistant steel alloys ... continued below

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Tylczak, Joseph H.; Rawers, James C. & Blankenship, Daniel January 1, 2005.

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The effect of CO2 as a greenhouse gas, and the potential of global warming, has led to the study of sequestration of CO2 as a mineral carbonate. Some of the processes of mineral sequestration involve handing large tonnages of silicate minerals and reacting them with CO2. In this study the Albany Research Center evaluated the effects of wear and corrosion individually, and any possible synergetic effects resulting from a combination of wear and corrosion, on steel alloys that might be used in CO2 sequestration. By understanding the mechanism of slurry material loss, a better selection of erosion/corrosion resistant steel alloys can be chosen which in turn help plan construction costs. Four different conventional alloys were chosen. The alloys include AISI 1080 carbon steel, a 9Cr, 1 Mo steel, a 316 stainless steel, and a heat treatable 440C stainless steel. These materials covered a large range of alloy composition and cost. A variety of erosion and corrosion tests were used to evaluate the steels response to selected sequestration environments. The tests used included: (i) wear from dry Jet and HAET erosion tests, (ii) corrosion from immersion tests, and (iii) slurry erosion/corrosion tests. The slurry wear tests were conducted using a 270-μm silica abrasive in water and a solution (a mixture of sodium chloride, magnesium chloride, and sodium carbonate) saturated with CO2 at pH levels of 4.5 and 9.4. The results of these tests were compared with the results dry erosion and immersion corrosion tests. The results of the various tests were then used to evaluate the mechanism of material loss and determine is the presence of synergetic effects. The corrosion test showed little loss of material for all alloys. The erosion tests showed only a small difference between alloys. The slurry tests showed synergistic effect of combining erosion and corrosion resulted in a significant additional loss of material. It was further found both increasing the hardness and amounts of substitution chromium decreased the alloy loss rate.

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Publisher -- 22nd Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference CD-ROM Proceedings, ISBN 1-890977-22-5, PCC 2005, session 51, paper 1, PDF file #250, 12 pp.

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  • 22nd Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, Sept. 12-15, 2005

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  • Report No.: DOE/ARC-2005-083
  • Grant Number: None
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 901138
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc889440

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  • January 1, 2005

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 4, 2016, 2:05 p.m.

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Tylczak, Joseph H.; Rawers, James C. & Blankenship, Daniel. A study of steel alloys for potential use in CO2 sequestration, article, January 1, 2005; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc889440/: accessed August 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.