Electron Emission as a Probe of Plastic Deformation in Single Crystal Metals

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Work under this grant focused on the use of photoelectron emission as a probe of deformation processes in metals, principally single crystal and polycrystalline aluminum. Dislocations intersecting the surface produce patches of low work function metal which emit electrons when illuminated with the appropriate ultraviolet radiation. We have shown that changes in the photoemission signals during deformation can be used to identify the onset of strain localization. In some systems, the photoelectron kinetic energy distribution reflects the distribution of surface orientations, which depends on the competition between grain rotation and slip. Photoemission electron microscope images of shape memory alloys and ... continued below

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Dickinson, J. Thomas September 28, 2007.

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Description

Work under this grant focused on the use of photoelectron emission as a probe of deformation processes in metals, principally single crystal and polycrystalline aluminum. Dislocations intersecting the surface produce patches of low work function metal which emit electrons when illuminated with the appropriate ultraviolet radiation. We have shown that changes in the photoemission signals during deformation can be used to identify the onset of strain localization. In some systems, the photoelectron kinetic energy distribution reflects the distribution of surface orientations, which depends on the competition between grain rotation and slip. Photoemission electron microscope images of shape memory alloys and thin films show marked changes in intensity and surface topography as the materal passes through its transition temperature. Photoelectron emission provides important information on the temporal progress of deformation processes that complements the spatial information provided by other techniques.

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  • Report No.: DOE02ER45988-100
  • Grant Number: FG03-02ER45988
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 916945
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc888478

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  • September 28, 2007

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 4, 2016, 5:46 p.m.

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Dickinson, J. Thomas. Electron Emission as a Probe of Plastic Deformation in Single Crystal Metals, text, September 28, 2007; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc888478/: accessed August 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.