Very High Energy Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants and Constraints on the Galactic Interstellar Radiation Field

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The large-scale Galactic interstellar radiation field (ISRF) is the result of stellar emission and dust re-processing of starlight. Where the energy density of the ISRF is high (e.g., the Galactic Centre), the dominant {gamma}-ray emission in individual supernova remnants (SNRs), such as G0.9+0.1, may come from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of the ISRF. Several models of the ISRF exist. The most recent one, which has been calculated by us, predicts a significantly higher ISRF than the well used model of Mathis, Mezger, and Panagia [1]. However, comparison with data is limited to local observations. Based on our current estimate of ... continued below

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Porter, T.A.; Moskalenko, I.V. & Strong, A.W. April 30, 2007.

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The large-scale Galactic interstellar radiation field (ISRF) is the result of stellar emission and dust re-processing of starlight. Where the energy density of the ISRF is high (e.g., the Galactic Centre), the dominant {gamma}-ray emission in individual supernova remnants (SNRs), such as G0.9+0.1, may come from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of the ISRF. Several models of the ISRF exist. The most recent one, which has been calculated by us, predicts a significantly higher ISRF than the well used model of Mathis, Mezger, and Panagia [1]. However, comparison with data is limited to local observations. Based on our current estimate of the ISRF we predict the gamma-ray emission in the SNRs G0.9+0.1 and RXJ1713, and pair-production absorption features above 20 TeV in the spectra of G0.9+0.1, J1713-381, and J1634-472. We discuss how GLAST, along with current and future very high energy instruments, may be able to provide upper bounds on the large-scale ISRF.

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  • Contributed to 1st GLAST Symposium, Stanford, Palo Alto, 5-8 Feb 2007

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  • Report No.: SLAC-PUB-12466
  • Grant Number: AC02-76SF00515
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 903008
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc888364

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  • April 30, 2007

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Dec. 2, 2016, 6:09 p.m.

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Porter, T.A.; Moskalenko, I.V. & Strong, A.W. Very High Energy Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants and Constraints on the Galactic Interstellar Radiation Field, article, April 30, 2007; [Menlo Park, California]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc888364/: accessed September 25, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.