Oxidation and Volatilization from Tantalum Alloy During Air Exposure

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Tantalum alloys are one of the refractory metals with renewed consideration for high temperatures in fusion reactor applications. Tantalum alloys perform well in protective environments but are oxidized readily in gases containing higher oxygen levels. In addition, the radioactive isotope Ta-182 would be produced in tantalum and could be a significant contributor to dose if mobilized. Other isotopes of importance are produced from tungsten and hafnium. Mobilization of activated products during an accident with air ingress is therefore a safety issue. In this study, we measured the extent of oxidation and mobilization from tantalum alloy T-222 oxidized in flowing air ... continued below

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Smolik, Galen Richard; Petti, David Andrew & Schuetz, Stanley Thomas October 1, 2000.

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Tantalum alloys are one of the refractory metals with renewed consideration for high temperatures in fusion reactor applications. Tantalum alloys perform well in protective environments but are oxidized readily in gases containing higher oxygen levels. In addition, the radioactive isotope Ta-182 would be produced in tantalum and could be a significant contributor to dose if mobilized. Other isotopes of importance are produced from tungsten and hafnium. Mobilization of activated products during an accident with air ingress is therefore a safety issue. In this study, we measured the extent of oxidation and mobilization from tantalum alloy T-222 oxidized in flowing air between 500 and 1200 degrees C. This alloy nominally contains 10 wt% tungsten, 2.5 wt% hafnium and 0.01 wt% carbon. We found that the mobilization of Ta and Hf was closely linked to the occurrence of oxide spalling. These elements showed no migration from the test chamber. Some W was mobilized by volatilization as evidenced by transport from the chamber. Tungsten volatilization could occur primarily during initial stages of oxidation before the formation of an oxide scale impedes the process. The mobilization of Ta and W are presented in terms of the mass flux (g/m2-h) as a function of test temperature. These measurements along with specific designs, activation calculations, and accident scenarios provide information useful for dose calculations of future fusion devices.

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  • 14th ANS Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy,Park City, UT,10/15/2000,10/19/2000

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  • Report No.: INEEL/CON-00-00876
  • Grant Number: DE-AC07-99ID-13727
  • DOI: 10.2172/776430 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 910892
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc887602

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  • October 1, 2000

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 30, 2016, 3:06 p.m.

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Smolik, Galen Richard; Petti, David Andrew & Schuetz, Stanley Thomas. Oxidation and Volatilization from Tantalum Alloy During Air Exposure, article, October 1, 2000; [Idaho Falls, Idaho]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc887602/: accessed October 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.